Mechanical Engineering

CLT OVERVIEW

DEPARTMENT OF MECHANICAL ENGINEERING

CENTER FOR LEARNING AND TEACHING

The DT Based curriculum – R2019 consists of Theory, Theory cum practical and Practical courses, with a total credit of 169 to be earned for the award of degree.  The Mechanical Engineering Program consists of Basic Science courses for 24 credits, Humanities and Management courses for 5 credits, Engineering Sciences courses for 20 credits, Program core for 51 credits, Program Elective and Open Elective courses for 30 credits, DT CFC / IIPC courses for 24 credits and DT SCD courses for 15 Credits. The mandatory courses are structured to impart the students with skills and knowledge required for the current industry requirements like soft skills, internships, latest trends in technology, capstone etc. The entire curriculum was structured keeping in mind the AICTE guidelines and the industry expectations from the graduates. The design thinking aspect was included in every course to make the students experience the five stages and imbibe the methodology and its solution-based approach.

TEACHING AND LEARNING

DEPARTMENT OF MECHANICAL ENGINEERING

STUDENT DEVELOPMENT ACTIVITIES

Various number of student development activities are constantly being practiced in each classrooms, enforced by our Center of Learning and Teaching.

TEACHING PEDAGOGIES

BEST PRACTICES

Integration of technology into education has enhanced the teaching/learning process to a higher level. The effective use of ICT in pedagogy has helped in grabbing the attention of the student throughout the session. Teaching-learning through various best practices such as Flipped Classroom, Role Play, Case Study, Group Discussion, Small Group Learning, Problem Based Learning, Project Based Learning etc., has elevated the level of it.

  • Outbound Training given to students to keep them mentally fit

  • Implementing Design Thinking mode of Learning

  • Kahoot Assessment

  • Debate on Current Topics

  • ICT enabled Classrooms and Teaching

  • Well developed curriculum and advanced learning materials through an online platform Courseware

  • Technical game play in current topics

  • Demo models for practical exposure

  • Adopting Bloom’s Taxonomy for deep learning and understanding

  • Providing students with all materials needed to complete an assignment

  • Defining clear classroom and assignment expectations and procedures

  • Presenting the goal and objective for each assignment

  • Encouragement and positive feedback to students

  • Allowing students to keep track of their learning progress

  • Accessibility of students via electronic communication

  • Monitoring student work

  • Allowing students to progress through assignments at their own pace

  • Providing help to understand and practice new knowledge

  • Allowing students to ask questions during online courses/assignments

  • Solutions-based teaching to solve problems

  • Supported by a collection of strategies and methods.

  • Develop empathy and understand the needs of the people we are designing solutions for.

  • Define problems and opportunities for designing solutions.

  • Generate and visualize creative ideas.

  • Develop prototypes.

  • Evaluate and test their designed solutions.

  • Learning Through Argumentation

  • Incidental Learning

  • Computational Thinking

  • Class Room Delivery Structure Description with photos & Links for sample

  • SNS Courseware

  • Teachers Manual and Workbook

  • Bloom’s Taxonomy

  • CO Assessment

  • Project-Based Learning, Problem Based Learning, Activity Based Learning, Google Class
    Room and Onsite Teaching

  • Gallery Walk, Game-Based Learning, Mind mapping chart, Industry based case study

CURRICULUM FRAMEWORK

DESIGN THINKING BASED EDUCATIONAL FRAMEWORK

    INSTITUTIONAL DT COURSES

  • DESIGN THINKING

  • LIFE SKILL DEVELOPMENT

  • COMMUNICATIVE ENGLISH

  • PROFESSIONAL COMMUNICATION

  • PERSONALITY DEVELOPMENT

  • FOREIGN LANGUAGES

  • GLOBAL BUSINESS ETHICS AND LAW

  • VERBAL/QUANTITATIVE APTITUDE/REASONING

  • ESSENCE OF GLOBAL CULTURE

    PROGRAM DT COURSES

  • EMERGING MOOC COURSES

  • 2 CODING LANGUAGES

  • 2 DEPARTMENT SPECIFIC TOOLS

  • BASIC S&H COURSES

  • PROGRAM SPECIFIC ENGINEERING/ ARTS/ SCIENCE/ CORE/ ELECTIVE COURSES

  • 5 INNOVATIVE TECHNOLOGIES

    CAREER DT COURSES

  • MINI PROJECTS

  • INTERNSHIPS

  • INDUSTRIAL TRAINING

  • INDUSTRIAL PROJECTS

  • STUDENTS EXCHANGE PROGRAMME

  • CAPSTONE PROJECT

  • 4 CAREER TRACKS

    NON-ACADEMIC DT COURSES

  • WEEKEND ONLINE PRACTICE

  • CODING

  • SUBJECT DOMAIN SPECIFIC

  • VQAR

  • INNOVATIVE TECHNOLOGIES/TOOLS

  • EXTRA CURRICULAR ACTIVITIES

  • YOGA/ MEDITATION/ READING/ CLUB ACTIVITIES/ SPORTS/ TOP CONTEST PARTICIPATION

4 CAREER TRACKS

DESIGN THINKING

Design thinking is a novel approach of solving engineering and social problem from the customer perspective. All most all global corporate giants are pioneering in design thinking and internationally recognized universities and institutions are also deploying design thinking in their curriculum. We are 1st  institutions in India who has successfully implemented design thinking at our curriculum level and have also trained faculties and students in the process. Design thinking makes the students more inclined to the customer perspective to identify their need and employ technology to provide it.

7+5 THRUST AREAS

The world as we know is is moving to greater heights with seven fields comprising Agriculture and Food Technology, Healthcare and Biomedical, Power & Energy, Aerospace and Defence, Automobile, Smart city and Fintech, being the fore runners in the world economy. There are five revolutionary technologies of Augmented Reality & Virtual Realty, Internet of Things, Data Analytics, Robotics and Automation and 3D Printing. The combination of the fields and the influencing technologies are framed as the 7+5 thrust areas. The institution focuses and works in these seven fields through the five technologies. Students and faculty as one are given opportunity to learn, practice and master over these areas.

Industry Verticals

  • Agriculture & Food Technology
  • Healthcare & Biomedical
  • Power & Energy
  • Aerospace & Defence
  • Automobiles
  • Smart city
  • Fintech

Technology

  • Augmented Reality / Virtual Reality
  • Internet of Things
  • Data Analytics
  • Robotics & Automation
  • 3D Printing

BUSINESS MODEL CANVAS (BMC)

As a part of start-up culture, Aspiring Entrepreneurs should aware about Business Model Canvas (BMC) while pitching the startup idea to investors.  Business Model Canvas (BMC) should be short, simple and compelling.

For that our curriculum is implemented with Design thinking. So every student exposure to different canvas model for business.

SNS Courseware

Every course teacher uploads his/her lesson plan, lecture notes, assignments, Puzzles, Question banks with answer keys, multiple-choice questions (MCQs), etc in the college web portal www.snscourseware.org which are accessible by the students anywhere at any time. All the contents shared in the classroom are also uploaded on the website for students’ reference. Online learning holds the promise of broadening access to higher education to more individuals, while also lowering costs for students

SNS Courseware

CURRICULUM AND SYLLABUS

Description / Semester AICTE SNSCT – Mech Suggested Sem 1 Sem 2 Sem 3 Sem 4 Sem 5 Sem 6 Sem 7 Sem 8
Basic Science (BSC) 25 24 8 8 3 3     2  
HSMC 12 5 3 2            
Engineering Sciences (ESC) 24 22 8 12 2          
Programme Core (PCC) 48 60     15 17 15 13    
Programme Elective (PEC) 18 9         3 3 3  
Open Elective (OEC) 18 6           3 3  
Project/Seminar/Internship 15 42 2 1 5 6 5 4 5 14
Mandatory Courses (MC)                  
TOTAL 160 168 21 23 25 26 23 23 13 14
SEMESTER I
S No. Course Code Course L T P J Contact hrs/week Credit Int/Ext Category
Theory Courses
1.        19MAT101 Linear Algebra and Calculus 3 1 0 0 4 4 50/50 BSC
2.        19MET101 Engineering Drawing 1 0 4 0 5 3 50/50 ESC
3.        19EET101 Basics of Electrical and Electronics Engineering 3 0 0 0 3 3 50/50 ESC
Theory Integrated Practical Courses
4.        19CHB101 Chemistry for Engineers 3 0 2 0 5 4 60/40 BSC
5.        19ENB101 Communicative English 2 0 2 0 4 3 60/40 HSMC
6.        19GEB101 Design Thinking and Innovation 1 0 0 2 3 2 100/0 EEC
Practical courses
7.        19GEP101 Workshop Practices Laboratory 0 0 4 0 4 2 60/40 ESC
Mandatory Course
  8. 3 Weeks Induction Program MC
  Total 13/1/12/2 28 21    
SEMESTER II
S No. Course Code Course L T P J Contact hrs/week Credit Int/Ext Category
Theory Courses
1.        19ITT101 Programming in C and Data Structures 3 0 0 0 3 3 50/50 ESC
2.        19MET102 Engineering Mechanics 3 1 0 0 4 4 50/50 ESC
3.        19MET104 Basics in Engineering 3 0 0 0 3 3 50/50 ESC
Theory Integrated Practical Courses
4.        19MAB102 Integral Calculus and Laplace Transforms 3 0 2 0 5 4 60/40 BSC
5.        19PYB103 Physics for Engineers 3 0 2 0 5 4 60/40 BSC
Practical courses
6.        19ENP101 Professional Communication 0 0 4 0 4 2 60/40 HSMC
7.        19ITP101 Programming in C and Data Structures Laboratory 0 0 4 0 4 2 60/40 ESC
8.        19MEP105 Mini Project Using CAD Tool 0 0 2 0 2 1 100/0 EEC
Mandatory Course
9.        19HST101 Environmental Sciences 2 0 0 0 2 0 100/0 MC
  Total 17/1/14/0 32 23    
SEMESTER III
S No. Course Code Course L T P J Contact hrs/week Credit Int/Ext Category PRE-REQUISITES
Theory Courses
1.        Transforms and Partial Differential Equations 3 0 0 0 3 3 50/50 BSC 19MAT101

19MAB102

2.        19MET201 Engineering Thermodynamics 3 0 0 0 3 3 50/50 PCC
3.        19MET202 Manufacturing Technology 3 0 0 0 3 3 50/50 PCC
4.        19MET203 Engineering Materials and Metallurgy 2 0 0 0 2 2 50/50 PCC
Theory Integrated Practical Courses
5.        19MEB204 Fluid Mechanics and Machinery 3 0 2 0 5 4 60/40 PCC
6.        19EEB220 Electrical Machines and Drives 2 0 2 0 4 3 60/40 PCC 19EET101
Practical Courses
7.        Python Programming 0 0 4 0 4 2 60/40 ESC
8.        19MEP205 Mini Project on Material Testing 0 0 0 2 2 1 100/0 EEC
Mandatory Courses
9.        Personality Development 2 0 0 0 2 2 100/0 MC
10.    VQAR-I 2 0 0 0 2 2 100/0 MC
  Total 20/0/8/2 30 25      
SEMESTER IV
S No. Course Code Course L T P J Contact hrs/week Credit Int/Ext Category PRE-REQUISITES
Theory Courses
1.        Statistics and Numerical Methods 3 0 0 0 3 3 50/50 BSC
2.        19MET206 Strength of Materials 3 0 0 0 3 3 50/50 PCC 19MET102
3.        19MET207 Metrology and Measurements 2 0 0 0 2 2 50/50 PCC
Theory Integrated Practical Courses
4.        19MEB208 Thermal Engineering 3 0 2 0 5 4 60/40 PCC
5.        19MEB209 Fluid Power Control 2 0 2 0 4 3 60/40 PCC
6.        19MEB210 Internet of Things for Production Systems 2 0 2 0 4 3 60/40 PCC
Practical Courses
7.        19MEP211 Manufacturing & Measurements Laboratory 0 0 4 0 4 2 60/40 PCC
Mandatory Courses
8.        Summer Internship 4 Weeks 2 100/0 EEC
9.        VQAR-II 2 0 0 0 2 2 100/0 MC
10.    Ad.Lang (MOOC) 2 0 0 0 2 2 100/0 MC
  Total 19/0/10/0 29 26      
SEMESTER V
S No. Course Code Course L T P J Contact hrs/week Credit Int/Ext Category PRE-REQUISITES
Theory Courses
1.        19MET301 Design of Machine Elements 3 0 0 0 3 3 50/50 PCC 19MET206
2.        19MET302 Theory of Machines 3 1 0 0 4 4 50/50 PCC 19MET102
3.        Professional Elective – I 3 0 0 0 3 3 50/50 PEC
Theory Integrated Practical Courses
4.        19MEB303 CAD & Robotics 3 0 2 0 5 4 60/40 PCC
5.        Electronics and Microprocessor 2 0 2 0 4 3 60/40 PCC
Practical Courses
6.        19MEP304 Dynamics Laboratory 0 0 2 0 2 1 60/40 PCC
7.        19MEP305 Mini Project -Design and Fabrication 0 0 0 2 2 1 100/0 EEC
Mandatory Courses
8.        Career Course -I 0 0 0 2 2 2 100/0 MC
9.        Career Course – II 0 0 0 2 2 2 100/0 MC
  Total 14/1/6/6 27 23      
SEMESTER VI
S No. Course Code Course L T P J Contact hrs/week Credit Int/Ext Category PRE-REQUISITES
Theory Courses
1.        19MET306 Design of Transmission Systems 3 0 0 0 3 3 50/50 PCC 19MET301
2.        Professional Elective – II 3 0 0 0 3 3 50/50 PEC
3.        Open Elective – I 3 0 0 0 3 3 50/50 OEC
Theory Integrated Practical Courses
4.        19MEB307 Heat & Mass Transfer 3 0 2 0 5 4 60/40 PCC 19MEB208
5.        19MEB308 Finite Element Analysis 3 0 2 0 5 4 60/40 PCC
Practical Courses
6.        19MEP309 Data Analytics 0 0 4 0 4 2 60/40 PCC
Mandatory Courses
7.        Summer Internship 4 Weeks 2 100/0 EEC
8.        Career Course -III 0 0 0 2 2 2 100/0 MC
  Total 15/0/8/2 25 23      
SEMESTER VII
S No. Course Code Course L T P J Contact hrs/week Credit Int/Ext Category PRE-REQUISITES
Theory Courses
1.        Biology for Engineers 2 0 0 0 2 2 50/50 BSC
2.        Professional Elective – III 3 0 0 0 3 3 50/50 PEC
3.        Open Elective – II 3 0 0 0 3 3 50/50 OEC
Practical courses
4.        19MEP401 Project – I 0 0 0 4 4 2 60/40 EEC
Mandatory Courses
5.        3D Printing in MOOC / NPTEL 0 0 4 0 4 2 100/0 EEC
6.        Life Skill Course 0 0 0 2 2 1 100/0 MC
7.        19HST102 Indian Constitution 0 0 0 2 2 0 100/0 MC
  Total 8/0/4/8 20 13      
SEMESTER VIII
S No. Course Code Course L T P J Contact hrs/week Credit Int/Ext Category PRE-REQUISITES
Practical courses
1.        19MEP402 Project – II 0 0 0 24 24 12 60/40 EEC
2.        Augmented Reality / Virtual Reality / MOOC 0 0 0 4 4 2 100/0 EEC
  Total 0/0/0/28 28 14      
S.No Courses Offered L T P J C
Aerospace & Defense
1. Additive Manufacturing of Emerging Materials 3 0 0 0 3
2. Laser Materials Processing and Applications 3 0 0 0 3
3. Flexible Product Development 3 0 0 0 3
4. Fluid Dynamics and Numerical Simulation 3 0 0 0 3
5. Rapid Prototyping: Principles and Applications 3 0 0 0 3
6. Mechanics of Composite materials 3 0 0 0 3
7. Nano and Micromachining 3 0 0 0 3
8. Smart Materials and its applications 3 0 0 0 3
9. Micro-electromechanical systems (MEMS) 3 0 0 0 3
10. Flight Control Systems 3 0 0 0 3
11. Avionics Navigation Systems 3 0 0 0 3
12. Computational Fluid Dynamics 3 0 0 0 3
13. Advanced Welding Technology 3 0 0 0 3
S.No Courses Offered L T P J C
Automobile
1 3D Printing: Technology, Applications, and Selection 3 0 0 0 3
2 Integrated Manufacturing Systems 3 0 0 0 3
3 Mechatronic Systems: Fundamentals 3 0 0 0 3
4 Automotive and Mobility Studies 3 0 0 0 3
5 Automation and Simulation 3 0 0 0 3
6 Automotive NVH Technology 3 0 0 0 3
7 Design for Manufacture and Assembly 3 0 0 0 3
8 Principles and Applications of Tribology 3 0 0 0 3
9 Design of Jigs, Fixtures and Press Tools 3 0 0 0 3
10 Machine Drawing 3 0 0 0 3
11 Non Destructive Testing 3 0 0 0 3
12 Mechanical Vibrations 3 0 0 0 3
13 Electric Vehicle Technology 3 0 0 0 3
14 Failure Analysis of Engineering Materials 3 0 0 0 3
S.No Courses Offered L T P J C
Smart City
1. Smart Factory and Industry 4.0 3 0 0 0 3
2. Robotics for Future Industrial Applications 3 0 0 0 3
3. Nano Technology 3 0 0 0 3
4. Optimization Techniques 3 0 0 0 3
5. Lean Six Sigma for Supply Chain Management 3 0 0 0 3
6. Food, Design & Technology 3 0 0 0 3
7. Economy of Clean Energy Transitions 3 0 0 0 3
8. Product Life cycle Management 3 0 0 0 3
9. Biomaterials and Biosensors 3 0 0 0 3
10. Applied Hydraulics and Pneumatics 3 0 0 0 3

S.No Courses Offered L T P J C
Power & Energy
1. Solar Photovoltaics: Fundamentals, Technologies And Applications 3 0 0 0 3
2. Fuel Cell Technology 3 0 0 0 3
3. Heat Pipes: Theory, Design and Applications 3 0 0 0 3
4. Thermoelectrics: Design and Materials 3 0 0 0 3
5. Heat Transfer in Electronic Systems 3 0 0 0 3
6. Nuclear Energy 3 0 0 0 3
7. Power Plant Engineering 3 0 0 0 3
8. Wind Energy Engineering 3 0 0 0 3
9. Gas Turbine Design Analysis 3 0 0 0 3
10. Energy Storage: Systems and Components 3 0 0 0 3
11. Renewable source of Energy 3 0 0 0 3

S.No Courses Offered L T P J C
Management
1. Total Quality Management 3 0 0 0 3
2. Principles of Management 3 0 0 0 3
3. Engineering Economics and Cost Analysis 3 0 0 0 3
4. Intellectual Property Rights 3 0 0 0 3
S.No COURSES OFFERED L T P J C
1 Data Analytics 3 0 0 0 3
2 Design of Experiments 3 0 0 0 3
3 Heating Ventilation and Air conditioning Systems 3 0 0 0 3
4 Casting Design and Performance 3 0 0 0 3
5 Product Design and Development 3 0 0 0 3
6 Solar Energy Utilization 3 0 0 0 3
7 New Product Development 3 0 0 0 3
8 Industrial Safety 3 0 0 0 3
9 Energy Auditing 3 0 0 0 3
10 Robotics & Automation 3 0 0 0 3
11 3D printing Technologies 3 0 0 0 3
12 Industrial IoT 3 0 0 0 3

FACULTY DEVELOPMENT

Faculty Development

All the faculties are having culture to constantly enrich their knowledge by attending faculty development courses and Short term courses organised under ATAL , TEQIP, QIP, Guest Lectures, seminars, conference and much more programs in various International universities, IITs, NITs, IIITs and other government institutions during their summer and winter vacation. The Emerging domains like Iot, Data Analytics, AR /VR, 3D printing, Robotics and Automation are the major topics that chosen by the faculties that can be matched with our institute thrust area. All the faculties are mandated to get NPTEL certificates for every academic year. Besides 11 faculties earned Autodesk certification program and 02 faculties get their ANSYS certificate for inhouse training to the student’s community.

DOCTORATES

Dr. P. Tamil Selvam
Dr. P. Tamil Selvam
Professor & Dean
Dr. M. Subramanian
Dr. M. Subramanian
Professor
Dr. J. Kannappan
Dr. J. Kannappan
Professor
Dr. L. Savadamuthu
Dr. L. Savadamuthu
Professor
Dr. T. Prakash
Dr. T. Prakash
Professor
Dr. M. Elangovan
Dr. M. Elangovan
Professor
Dr. B. Ashok Kumar
Dr. B. Ashok Kumar
Professor
Dr. C. Sowmya Dhanalakshmi
Dr. C. Sowmya Dhanalakshmi
Associate Professor
Dr. P. Madhu
Dr. P. Madhu
Associate Professor
Dr. V. Gopalakrishnan
Dr. V. Gopalakrishnan
Assistant Professor

FACULTY ACHIEVEMENTS

  • T.Prakash, Professor received Certificate of Lifetime Membership award and National Governing Council Member from Indian Welding Society on June 2019
  • M.Elangovan Professor received best project of the year award and cash prize from Karnataka state council for science and technology for the project Design and fabrication of articulated 3D Printer supported by Department of science and Technology, Government of India on 27th July, 2019.
  • M.Elangovan Professor received Special recognition awards for the contributions to CAD/CAM by Autodesk and CADD for 2019
  • M.Mohammed Ariffuddeen, Associate Professor, received making a difference award to the department of Mechanical Enigneering for Santa 365 by SNS Institutions on 20th December 2019.
  • B.Karthick, Assistant Professor, received maximum contributor award for Santa 365 by SNS Institutions on 20th December 2019.
  • M.Sindhukavi, Assistant Professor, received maximum contributor award for Santa 365 by SNS Institutions on 20th December 2019.
  • M.Sureshkumar, Assistant Professor received IRONMAN, Executive corporate connect award from SNS Breakthrough on 17th June 2019
  • P.Tamilselvam Professor and Head received Distinguished Professor and head award ’18 from RULA International awards on 15th August 2018.
  • T.Prakash, Professor received Distinguished Professor award ’18 from RULA International awards on 15th August 2018.
  • T.Prakash, Professor received Certificate of Lifetime Membership from International Journal for Research under Literal Access since 15th August 2018
  • C.Senthilkumar, Associate Professor received Distinguished Professor and head award ’18 from RULA International awards on 15th August 2018.
  • P.Tamilselvam, Professor and Head received Innovative scientific research technologies and dedicated best professor award from SIESRB on 25th March 2018.
  • T.Prakash, Professor received Innovative scientific research technologies and dedicated best professor award from SIESRB on 25th March 2018.
  • G.Tharanitharan Assistant Professor received Best teacher national award from JRDP Group of journals, Chennai on 30th May 2018.
  • T.Prakash, Professor received Certificate of outstanding contribution in reviewing journal award from Elsevier on May 2017

FACULTY DEVELOPMENT ACTIVITIES

  • M.Saravana Kumar, Assistant Professor of Mechanical Department attended a Faculty Development Programme on “Essential Techniques For Research Problems In Manufacturing And Measurement”  organized by NIT- Warangal  from 11-07.2016 to 15-07-2016
  • V.R.Hariram, Assistant Professor of Mechanical Department attended a Faculty Development Programme on “Six Sigma Black Belt”  organized by MSME, Coimbatore from 24-07-2016 to 16-10-2016
  • T.Pravin, Assistant Professor of Mechanical Department attended a Faculty Development Programme on “Advances in Materials Processing Techniques”  organized by Pondicherry Engineering College, Puducherry from 05-12-2016 to 09-12-2016
  • “Mr.C.Senthil Kumar, Associate Professor of Mechanical Department attended a Faculty Development Programme on “Introduction to Heat Pipe Science and Technology”  organized by IIT Indore  from 06-12-2016 to 19-12-2016”
  • “Mr.M.Suresh Kumar, Assistant Professor of Mechanical Department attended a Faculty Development Programme on “Hybrid Composites: Manufacturing, Mechanics and Materials”  organized by NIT, Surathkal from 18-12-2016 to 22-12-2016”
  • “Mr.G.Tharanitharan, Assistant Professor of Mechanical Department attended a Faculty Development Programme on “Hybrid Composites: Manufacturing, Mechanics and Materials”  organized by NIT, Surathkal from 18-12-2016 to 22-12-2016”
  • “Mr.P.Janagarathinam, Assistant Professor of Mechanical Department attended a Faculty Development Programme on “Mechanics of Fracture”  organized by IIT-Madras from 19-12-2016 to 23-12-2016”
  • “Mr.S.Hemnath, Assistant Professor of Mechanical Department attended a Faculty Development Programme on “Mechanics of Fracture”  organized by IIT-Madras from 19-12-2016 to 23-12-2016”
  • “Mr.V.Karthik, Assistant Professor of Mechanical Department attended a Faculty Development Programme on “NEN Entrepreneurship Educator Program”  organized by Anna University Regional Campus, Coimbatore from 04-01-2017 to 06-01-2017”
  • “Dr.M.Subramanian, Professor of Mechanical Department attended a Faculty Development Programme on “NEN Entrepreneurship Educator Program”  organized by Anna University Regional Campus, Coimbatore from 04-01-2017 to 06-01-2017”
  • “Mr.A.Chelliah, Assistant Professor of Mechanical Department attended a Faculty Development Programme on “Solar Energy Technologies”  organized by NIT- Trichy from 08-05-2017 to 18-05-2017”
  • “Mr.R.Ganesh Kumar, Assistant Professor of Mechanical Department attended a Faculty Development Programme on “Recent Developments in Conventional and Non-Conventional Energy Resources”  organized by Pondicherry Engineering College from 06-11-2017  to  10-11-2017”
  • “Mr.A.Vimal Kodeeswaran, Assistant Professor of Mechanical Department attended a Faculty Development Programme on “Recent Developments in Conventional and Non-Conventional Energy Resources”  organized by Pondicherry Engineering College from 06-11-2017  to  10-11-2017”
  • “Mr.C.Somu, Assistant Professor of Mechanical Department attended a Faculty Development Programme on “Industrial Automation”  organized by Thiagarajar College of Engineering from 20-11-2017 to 03-12-2017”
  • T.Venkatajalapathi, Associate Professor of Mechanical Department attended a Faculty Development Programme on “Introduction to Numerical Heat transfer, Fluid flow and its application”  organized by Coimbatore Institute of Technology, Coimbatore from 28 -05-2018  to  03 -06-2018
  • T.Prakash, Professor of Mechanical Department attended a Faculty Development Programme on  “Ansys – Workbench Environment”  organized by Coimbatore Institute of Technology -TLC , Coimbatore from 03-10-2018 to  07-10-2018
  • S.Sureshkumar, Assistant Professor of Mechanical Department attended a Faculty Development Programme on  “Ansys – Workbench Environment”  organized by Coimbatore Institute of Technology -TLC , Coimbatore from 03-10-2018 to  07-10-2018
  • V.Karthik, Assistant Professor of Mechanical Department attended a Faculty Development Programme on  “Entrepreneurship”  organized by Rathinam Technical campus, Coimbatore from 04-06-18 to 09-06-18
  • R.Karthikeyan, Assistant Professor of Mechanical Department attended a Faculty Development Programme on  “Electric Vehicle”  organized by NIT, Warangal,Telungana  from 28-05-2018 to  01-06-2018
  • C.Somu, Assistant Professor of Mechanical Department attended a Faculty Development Programme on  “Electric Vehicle”  organized by NIT, Warangal,Telungana  from 28-05-2018 to  01-06-2018
  • Mr.A.Vimal kodeeswaran, Assistant Professor of Mechanical Department attended a Faculty Development Programme on  “Electric Vehicle”  organized by NIT, Warangal,Telungana  from 28-05-2018 to  01-06-2018
  • P.Tamilselvam, Professor and Head of Mechanical Department attended a Faculty Development Programme on  “Audodesk Certified Professional ”  organized by Autodesk   from  28-11-2018 to 30-11-2018
  • T.Prakash, Professor of Mechanical Department attended a Faculty Development Programme on  “Audodesk Certified Professional ”  organized by Autodesk   from  28-11-2018 to 30-11-2018
  • P.Ranjith, Associate Professor of Mechanical Department attended a Faculty Development Programme on “Audodesk Certified Professional ”  organized by Autodesk   from  28-11-2018 to 30-11-2018
  • G.Tharanitharan, Assistant Professor of Mechanical Department attended a Faculty Development Programme on  “Audodesk Certified Professional ”  organized by Autodesk   from  28-11-2018 to 30-11-2018
  • C.Somu, Assistant Professor of Mechanical Department attended a Faculty Development Programme on  “Audodesk Certified Professional ”  organized by Autodesk   from  28-11-2018 to 30-11-2018
  • B.Karthick, Assistant Professor of Mechanical Department attended a Faculty Development Programme on  “Audodesk Certified Professional ”  organized by Autodesk   from  28-11-2018 to 30-11-2018
  • R.Karthikeyan, Assistant Professor of Mechanical Department attended a Faculty Development Programme on  “Audodesk Certified Professional ”  organized by Autodesk   from  28-11-2018 to 30-11-2018
  • P. Janagarathinam, Assistant Professor of Mechanical Department attended a Faculty Development Programme on  “Audodesk Certified Professional ”  organized by Autodesk   from  28-11-2018 to 30-11-2018
  • B.K.Saravanan, Assistant Professor of Mechanical Department attended a Faculty Development Programme on  “Audodesk Certified Professional ”  organized by Autodesk   from  28-11-2018 to 30-11-2018
  • Prathikkumar, Assistant Professor of Mechanical Department attended a Faculty Development Programme on  “Audodesk Certified Professional ”  organized by Autodesk   from  28-11-2018 to 30-11-2018
  • B.Roobani, Assistant Professor of Mechanical Department attended a Faculty Development Programme on  “Audodesk Certified Professional ”  organized by Autodesk   from  28-11-2018 to 30-11-2018
  • B.Roobani, Assistant Professor of Mechanical Department attended a Faculty Development Programme on  “Audodesk Certified Professional ”  organized by Autodesk   from  28-11-2018 to 30-11-2018
  • C.Senthilkumar, Associate Professor of Mechanical Department attended a Faculty Development Programme on “LiIon Batteries:Fundamentals, Characterization Techniques and Applications ”  organized by Anna Univesity,Chennai  from  03-12-19 to 07-12-19
  • B.Karthick, Assistant Professor of Mechanical Department attended a Faculty Development Programme on “Scanning & Transmission Electron Microscopy in low dimensional structures”  organized by Anna Univesity,Chennai  from  03-12-19 to 07-12-19
  • M.Mohamed Ariffedden, Associate Professor of Mechanical Department attended a Faculty Development Programme on  “ Engineering Mechanics”  organized by KPR Institute of Engineering and Technology, Coimbatore from  03-12-2018 to 07-12-2018
  • T.Venkatajalapathi, Associate Professor of Mechanical Department attended a Faculty Development Programme on “Computional methods for integral & differential equation ”  organized by IIT- Varanasi from  10-12-18 to 16-12-18
  • C.Somu, Assistant Professor of Mechanical Department attended a Faculty Development Programme on “Computional methods for integral & differential equation ”  organized by IIT- Varanasi from  10-12-18 to 16-12-18
  • A.Vimalkodeeswaran Assistant Professor of Mechanical Department attended a Faculty Development Programme on “Computional methods for integral & differential equation ”  organized by IIT- Varanasi from  10-12-18 to 16-12-18
  • N.Mohan, Associate Professor of Mechanical Department attended a Faculty Development Programme on  “ Engineering Mechanics”  organized by KPR Institute of Engineering and Technology, Coimbatore from  03-12-2018 to 07-12-2018
  • P.Tamilselvam, Professor and Head of Mechanical Department attended a Faculty Development Programme on  “NBA Accreditation(ICT Mode)”  organized by NITTTR- Kolkatta from  22-04-2019 to26-04-2019
  • M.Sureshkumar, Assistant Professor of Mechanical Department attended a Faculty Development Programme on  “NBA Accreditation(ICT Mode)”  organized by NITTTR- Kolkatta from  22-04-2019 to26-04-2019
  • M. Naveenkumar, Assistant Professor of Mechanical Department attended a Faculty Development Programme on “ Finite Element Method and Computational Structural Dynamics”  organized by IIT, Roorkee  from  10-06-19 to 14-06-19
  • C.Somu, Assistant Professor of Mechanical Department attended a Faculty Development Programme on “ Finite Element Method and Computational Structural Dynamics”  organized by IIT, Roorkee  from  10-06-19 to 14-06-19
  • T.Venkatajalapathi, Associate Professor of Mechanical Department attended a Faculty Development Programme on “ Finite Element Method and Computational Structural Dynamics”  organized by IIT, Roorkee  from  10-06-19 to 14-06-19
  • G.Tharanitharan, Assistant Professor of Mechanical Department attended a Faculty Development Programme on “Business Across Borders –  A Country Study(48Hrs) course”  organized by AIMST University, Malaysia   from  04-09-19 to 10-09-19
  • C.Senthilkumar, Associate Professor of Mechanical Department attended a Faculty Development Programme on “Business Across Borders –  A Country Study(48Hrs) course”  organized by AIMST University, Malaysia   from  04-09-19 to 10-09-19
  • A. Natarajan, Associate Professor of Mechanical Department attended a Faculty Development Programme on “Business Across Borders –  A Country Study(48Hrs) course”  organized by AIMST University, Malaysia   from  04-09-19 to 10-09-19
  • A. Natarajan, Associate Professor of Mechanical Department attended a Faculty Development Programme on “Internet of Things: Concepts and Implementation ”  organized by IIITDM- Kancheepuram from  15 -11-19 to  19-11-19
  • M.Elangovan, Professor of Mechanical Department attended a Faculty Development Programme on “Internet of Things: Concepts and Implementation ”  organized by  IIITDM- Kancheepuram   from  15 -11-19 to  19-11-19
  • C.Somu, Assistant Professor of Mechanical Department attended a Faculty Development Programme on “Basics of formability, damage and their numerical simulations ”  organized by IIT-Bombay from  02-12-19 to 06-12-19
  • T.Pravin, Assistant Professor of Mechanical Department attended a Faculty Development Programme on “Basics of formability, damage and their numerical simulations ”  organized by IIT-Bombay from  02-12-19 to 06-12-19
  • B.Karthick, Assistant Professor of Mechanical Department attended a Faculty Development Programme on “Basics of formability, damage and their numerical simulations”  organized by IIT-Bombay from  02-12-19 to 06-12-19
  • M. Naveenkumar, Assistant Professor of Mechanical Department attended a Faculty Development Programme on “ Sustainable Engineering to address Food -Energy-water Nexus”  organized by IIT-Bombay from  09-12-19 to 13-12-19
  • T.Venkatajalapathi, Associate Professor of Mechanical Department attended a Faculty Development Programme on “ Sustainable Engineering to address Food -Energy-water Nexus”  organized by IIT-Bombay from  09-12-19 to 13-12-19
  • U. Karthick, Assistant Professor of Mechanical Department attended a Faculty Development Programme on “ Sustainable Engineering to address Food -Energy-water Nexus”  organized by IIT-Bombay from  09-12-19 to 13-12-19
  • C. Senthilkumar, Associate Professor of Mechanical Department attended a Faculty Development Programme on  “ Efficient Heat Transfer utilizing Liquid/Vapour phase change ”  organized by IIT-Madras  from  09-12-19 to 21-12-19
  • B.Karthick, Assistant Professor of Mechanical Department attended a Faculty Development Programme on “Additive Manufacturing and process optimization”  organized by NITTTR- Chandigarh  from  09-04-20 to 13-04-20
  • M.Naveenkumar, Assistant Professor of Mechanical Department attended a Faculty Development Programme on “Additive Manufacturing and process optimization”  organized by NITTTR- Chandigarh  from  09-04-20 to 13-04-20
  • M.Sindhukavi, Assistant Professor of Mechanical Department attended a Faculty Development Programme on “Additive Manufacturing and process optimization”  organized by NITTTR- Chandigarh  from  09-04-20 to 13-04-20
  • U.Karthick, Assistant Professor of Mechanical Department attended a Faculty Development Programme on “Additive Manufacturing and process optimization”  organized by NITTTR- Chandigarh  from  09-04-20 to 13-04-20
  • P.Tamilselvam, Professor and Dean of Mechanical Department attended a Faculty Development Programme on  “Additive Manufacturing and process optimization”  organized by NITTTR- Chandigarh  from  09-04-20 to 13-04-20
  • V.S. Kaushik, Assistant Professor of Mechanical Department attended a Faculty Development Programme on “Additive Manufacturing and process optimization”  organized by NITTTR- Chandigarh  from  09-04-20 to 13-04-20
  • M.Elangovan, Professor of Mechanical Department attended a Faculty Development Programme on  “Additive Manufacturing and process optimization”  organized by NITTTR- Chandigarh  from  09-04-20 to 13-04-20
  • Faculty Development Programme on “ME6603-Finite Element Analysis”  by Dr.P.Tamilselvam Professor and Head of Mechanical  Department  from SNS College of Technology,Coimbatore during the period 12.11.2018-26.11.2018.Around 50 members from the faculty community benefited from the session.
  • Faculty Development Programme on “ME6603-Finite Element Analysis”  by Dr.T.Prakash Professor of Mechanical  Department  from SNS College of Technology,Coimbatore during the period 12.11.2018-26.11.2018.Around 50 members from the faculty community benefited from the session.

WEBINARS

  • A Webinar on “Life after Graduation ” by Dr. Shyam Prasad Rajasekaran,  CEO& Entrepreneur  from Twirl Tact Solutions Pvt Ltd, Coimbatore   was conducted on 30-04-2020. Around 35 members from the faculty and students community benefited from the session.
  • A Webinar on “Steam Turbines” by Dr. A. Haiter Lenin, Professor in Mechanical department from TWOLLO University, Kombolcha, Ethiopia   was conducted on 07-05-2020. Around 22 members from the faculty and students community benefited from the session.
  • A Webinar on “Industry Expectations from an Engineering Graduate – A Bosch Perspective” by Mr. Karthik Rajapaul, Deputy HR Manager  from Robert Bosch Coimbatore  was conducted on 07-05-2020. Around 49 members from the faculty and students community benefited from the session.
  • A Webinar on “Desiccant based Dehumidification and cooling system” by Dr.D.B.Jani,Associate Professor in Mechanical Department  from Government College of Engineering,Dahod ,Gujarath was conducted on 07-05-2020. Around 24 members from the faculty and students community benefited from the session.
  • An International Webinar on “Advanced Machine learning” by Dr.M.Sridhar,Professor in Mechanical Department  from Nizwa College of Technology,Oman was conducted on 07-05-2020. Around 24 members from the faculty and students community benefited from the session.
  • An International Webinar on “Latest Trends on Supply Chain Technology” by Mr.Natesan Andiyappillai, Manager IT WMS Solutions,from CEVA Logistics US Inc., Houston, Texas, US was conducted on 07-05-2020. Around 28 members from the faculty and students community benefited from the session.
  • “An International Webinar on “”Opportunites and Industry Scenario in Abroad”” by Mr. Thirugnanam Natarajan, Manager,
  • ,from Thai Industries & Development Company Ltd, Thailand was conducted on 08-05-2020. Around 32 members from the faculty and students community benefited from the session. “
  • An International Webinar on “Oil Refining Technologies” by Mr. Dhanavel Gokulrajan,Specialist – Lipids,from Nestlé Research Konolfingen, Switzerland was conducted on 09-05-2020. Around 99 members from the faculty and students community benefited from the session.
  • An International Webinar on “Role of Mechanical Engineering in COVID19& Career opportunities for upcoming graduates” by Dr. Johnson Santhosh ASP/Mech,from Jimma University Ethiopia was conducted on 09-05-2020. Around 88 members from the faculty and students community benefited from the session.
  • An International Webinar on “Applications of Computational Fluid Dynamics in Bio Medical Engineering” by Dr. Kahar Bin Osman Professor in Mechanical ,from Universiti Teknologi Malaysia,Malaysia  was conducted on 14-05-2020. Around 72 members from the faculty and students community benefited from the session.
  • “An International Webinar on “”Fundamentals of Li-ion battery and Electric Vehicles”” by Satyam Panchal- Ph.D., P.Eng., Adjunct Professor, Department of Mechanical and Mechatronics Engineering, fromUniversity of Waterloo
  • Canada was conducted on 14-05-2020. Around 132 members from the faculty and students community benefited from the session. “
  • An International Webinar on “Intelectual Property Rights” by Er.Prem Charles Managing Partner and Indian Patent Agent,  from Inanse IP & Consultancy Services, Ethiopia  was conducted on 14-05-2020. Around 175  members from the faculty and students community benefited from the session.
  • An International Webinar on “Introduction to Industrial Robotics” by  Balkeshwar Singh, Professor in Mechanical Engineering, from Adama Science & Technology University, Adama City, Ethiopia  was conducted on 21-05-2020. Around 23  members from the faculty and students community benefited from the session.
  • An International Webinar on “Nano Technology and its Applications” by Dr.Ramachandran Rajan, Postdoctoral Fellow  from Shandong University of Technology, China was conducted on 21-05-2020. Around 25 members from the faculty and students community benefited from the session.
  • An International Webinar on “Recent trends in Fluid Dynamics and Thermal science” by Dr. Karthick Selvam, Postdoctoral Fellow  from University of Luxembourg, Luxembourg  was conducted on 21-05-2020. Around 21 members from the faculty and students community benefited from the session.
  • A Webinar on “What IT Wants” by Mr. Pranesh Suresh ,CS Training Specialist, from Amazon Development Centre, Bangalore was conducted on 23-05-2020. Around 25  members from the faculty and students community benefited from the session.
  • A Webinar on “Career in Robotics and Controls” by Mr. Ajay Prabhu , Electrical Engineer, from McCandless, Miami,Florida  was conducted on 25-05-2020. Around 218  members from the faculty and students community benefited from the session.
  • “A Webinar  on “”Strategy to Crack Competitive Exam in Mechanical Engineering”” by   Gowtham Palanivelu
  • Assistant Professor in Mechanical Engineering, from Government College of Engineering , Srirangam Trichy was conducted on 28-05-2020. Around 27  members from the faculty and students community benefited from the session. “
  • “A Webinar  on “”Exploring Different Tools to Secure Personal Data”” by   B.Renukadevi
  • Assistant Professor in Mechanical Engineering, from Sri Sairam Engineering College, Chennai  was conducted on 28-05-2020. Around 30  members from the faculty and students community benefited from the session. “
  • An International Webinar on “Introduction to Finite Element analysis” by Dr.Prabahar.T, Professor in Mechanical Department  from Nizwa College of Technology,Oman was conducted on 29-05-2020. Around 101 members from the faculty and students community benefited from the session.
  • A Webinar  on “Basic Course on CAE” by   Kaushik Rajalingam Senior Engineer, from Ford India Private Ltd, Chennai  was conducted on 30-05-2020. Around 38 members from the faculty and students community benefited from the session.
  • A Webinar  on “Advanced Welding technology” by   M.Manikandan, Associate Professor in Mechanical Department, from VIT University,Vellore  was conducted on 30-05-2020. Around 26 members from the faculty and students community benefited from the session.
  • A Webinar on “New Product Development” by  Eswari Sathyamoorthy, Product Development Manager, from Ford Motors Ltd. Chennai  was conducted on 04-06-2020. Around 17  members from the faculty and students community benefited from the session.
  • A Webinar on “Overview of Advanced New Product Design & Development: Automotive Trims / Plastics components Design – Concept to final Product” by Mr. Natarajan Palanisamy, Manager from Macbro Technology Private Limited, Erode was conducted on 04-06-2020. Around 100 members from the faculty and students community benefited from the session.
  • A Webinar on “Design and Development of White Goods” by  Ramu Manickam, Senior Product Design Engineer, from Seimens Bosch Ltd. Chennai  was conducted on 06-06-2020. Around 22 members from the faculty and students community benefited from the session.
  • A Webinar on “Entrepreneurship in Advertising Industry” by Dr. Kumaresan Palanisami Chairman/Managing Director from VIGSUN Communications Pvt Ltd, Mumbai was conducted on 06-06-2020. Around 26 members from the faculty and students community benefited from the session.
  • An International Webinar  on “Introduction to an Entrepreneur” by Mr.G.Jagadesh,Managing Director  from Nithin Associates, Botswana, Africa was conducted on 06-06-2020. Around 28 members from the faculty and students community benefited from the session.
  • An International Webinar on “Applications of FEA in Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering” by  Narasimma Chokalingam, Principal Engineer, from Collins Aerospace, California,USA  was conducted on 07-06-2020. Around 88 members from the faculty and students community benefited from the session.
  • An International Webinar on “Exporting & Importing” by  A.Ramprakash, Executive Engineer,  from SRM Imports, Melbourne, Australia  was conducted on 11-06-2020. Around 24  members from the faculty and students community benefited from the session.
  • “A Webinar on “”Basic Aerodynamic Concept”” by Mr.S.Loganathan,Senior Engineer from Royal Enfield Motors Limited
  • Chennai was conducted on 12-06-2020. Around 20 members from the faculty and students community benefited from the session.”
  • An International Webinar on “IEEE Educational Resources Preparing Students and Members for the post COVID era ” by Dr ChunChe Lance Fung, Emeritus Professor, from Murdoch University, Australia was conducted on 12-06-2020. Around 55 members from the faculty and students community benefited from the session.
  • “A Webinar on “”Introduction to Artificial Intelligence, Machine Learning and Cognitive Automation”” by Mr. Balaji Rasappa
  • Founder & Chief Technology & Product Officer from Tailwyndz USA was conducted on 12-06-2020. Around 102 members from the faculty and students community benefited from the session.”
  • A Webinar on “Hemming Technology in Automobile Sectors” by Mr. Dhanvanth Ponnuswamy, Product Design Engineer, from Mercedes Benz Research and Development India, Bangalore was conducted on 13-06-2020. Around 20 members from the faculty and students community benefited from the session.
  • “A Webinar on “”Automotive Systems”” by Mr.N.Shankar, Level 3Unix System Administrator from Eliga Innovative Technology
  • Bangalore was conducted on 14-06-2020. Around 23 members from the faculty and students community benefited from the session.”
  • A Webinar on “Transformation to BS VI in Commercial Vehicles” by  K.Saravanakumar,Manager, Truck and Bus Tyres, from Apollo Tyres,Global R&D centre,Chennai  was conducted on 14-06-2020. Around 85 members from the faculty and students community benefited from the session.
  • An International Webinar on “Composite materials and its Industry applications” by  Punitha kumari, Senior Researcher from Wuhan Institute of Technology,Wuhan,P.R.China was conducted on 15-06-2020. Around 50 members from the faculty and students community benefited from the session.
  • A Webinar on “Additive Manufacturing” by Mr. G. Arun Kumar, Design Engineer, from EGS Computers India Pvt Ltd , Chennai, was conducted on 15-06-2020. Around 30 members from the faculty and students community benefited from the session.
  • A Webinar on “Injection Moulding Concepts” by  M.Sasikumar, Managing Partner,  from Glidertech Instrumentation, Chennai  was conducted on 16-06-2020. Around 22  members from the faculty and students community benefited from the session.
  • An International Webinar on “Awareness of Substance Abuse” by  Dr C. James Olatunde Egele, Director of International Student Affairs, from Crown University College Accra,Ghana,Africa was conducted on 17-06-2020. Around 35 members from the faculty and students community benefited from the session.
  • A Webinar on “Zero Waste Zero Energy” by  A.D. Thirumoorthy, Energy Consultant, from Kashyap Consultancy Services, Thudiyalur, Coimbatore was conducted on 18-06-2020. Around 26 members from the faculty and students community benefited from the session.
  • An International Webinar on “Supply Chain and Logistiics” by  Deepa Mohanchander,Data governance Steward from Coca Cola Amatil Ltd,Australia was conducted on 18-06-2020. Around 23 members from the faculty and students community benefited from the session.
  • A Webinar on “Solar Technology” by Mr.Nambidhas Project Manager , from Solar Business Solutions, Coimbatore. was conducted on 18-06-2020. Around 27 members from the faculty and students community benefited from the session.
  • An International Webinar on “Smart Manufacturing” by  S.Reguram, Sr.Engineer,  from KWIX Global Solutions, Ashmone, Bundall, Australia  was conducted on 20-06-2020. Around 24  members from the faculty and students community benefited from the session.
  • A Webinar on “Passenger Vehicle Tyre – Manufacturing and Testing” by Mr.V.Manikandan,Senior Engineer, Tyre Design and Release from Ford Motor Company Ltd,Chennai  was conducted on 20-06-2020. Around 57 members from the faculty and students community benefited from the session.
  • A Webinar on “Introduction to Digital Marketing” by Mr.Sathyamoorthy Sivasubramaniam, Assistant Manager  from TATA Consultancy Service (TCS Kochi) was conducted on 20-06-2020. Around 20 members from the faculty and students community benefited from the session.
  • “A Webinar on “”Software Tesing and its Scope”” by Mr. Pathmanathan Kesavan, Consultant, from Deloitte Consulting Pvt. Ltd.
  • Bangalore was conducted on 20-06-2020. Around 35 members from the faculty and students community benefited from the session.”
  • A Webinar on “Product Development using Abaqus” by Dr.S.Praveen,Director  from Praveen Fabrics, Palladam Main Road,Thiruppur was conducted on 21-06-2020. Around 45 members from the faculty and students community benefited from the session.
  • A Webinar on ” Basics of Fatigue” by Mr. Srinivasan R & CAE Specialist from EASi Private Ltd , Chennai was conducted on 24-06-2020. Around 32 members from the faculty and students community benefited from the session.
  • A Webinar on “Energy Conservation in Power plant” by  P. Suresh, Manager, from CPP, JSW Steel Ltd., Salem was conducted on 25-06-2020. Around 56 members from the faculty and students community benefited from the session.
  • A Webinar on “Tekla job Drive for spot your career” by Mr.Vetrikumarraja Senior technical Analyst, from  IIDHS Engineering Solutions Pvt Limited,Coimbatore was conducted on 25-06-2020. Around 40 members from the faculty and students community benefited from the session.
  • A Webinar on “Geometric dimensioning and tolerancing (GD&T)” by  G.Veeramanikandan – Product Technical Leader, from Valeo India Ltd, Chennai  was conducted on 26-06-2020. Around 20 members from the faculty and students community benefited from the session.
  • A Webinar on “How to become an Entrepreneur” by Mr Vimal Maruthachalam,Managing Director  from Sri Surya Engineering, Coimbatore was conducted on 27-06-2020. Around 20 members from the faculty and students community benefited from the session.
  • A Webinar on “Challenges for Students after COVID-19” by Mr. Dinesh Kumar Murugan Entrepreneur, from Freelancer and Placement Trainer Coimbatore, was conducted on 27-06-2020. Around 35 members from the faculty and students community benefited from the session.
  • A Webinar on “Micro Electro Mechanical Systems” by Mr.B.Praveenkumar, Assistant Manager from Royal Enfield Motors Limited Chennai was conducted on 27-06-2020. Around 20 members from the faculty and students community benefited from the session.
  • A Webinar on ” Boiler Erection Commissioning” by Mr.M.Mallaiyan & Engineer from ISGEC Heavy Engineering, Chennai was conducted on 28-06-2020. Around 21 members from the faculty and students community benefited from the session.
  • A Webinar on “IP SECURITY” by Mr. M. Saravanan, Assistant Professor (Senior Grade) from KPR Institute of Engineering and Technology, Coimbatore was conducted on 01-10-2016. Around 82 members from the faculty and students community benefited from the session.

NPTEL / MOOC COURSE 

  • U.Karthick, Assistant Professor of Mechanical Department has completed NPTEL course with ELITE Grade on “Engineering Thermodynamics”
  • NAVEEN KUMAR K, Assistant Professor of Mechanical Department has completed NPTEL course successfully on “Laws of thermodynamics”
  • P.Divyakumar, Assistant Professor of Mechanical Department has completed NPTEL course with ELITE Grade on “Fundamentals of manufacturing processes”
  • MOHAMED ARIFFUDDEEN M, Assistant Professor of Mechanical Department has completed NPTEL course successfully on “Fundamentals of manufacturing processes”
  • Saravana Kumar, Assistant Professor of Mechanical Department has completed NPTEL course with ELITE Grade on “Fundamentals of manufacturing processes”
  • Sindhu Kavi M, Assistant Professor of Mechanical Department has completed NPTEL course with ELITE Grade on “Nature and Properties of Materials”
  • T.PRAVIN, Assistant Professor of Mechanical Department has completed NPTEL course with ELITE Grade on “Roadmap for patent creation”
  • M.SUBRAMANIAN, Professor of Mechanical Department has completed NPTEL course successfully on “Engineering Mechanics – Statics and Dynamics”
  • KARTHICK U, Assistant Professor of Mechanical Department has completed NPTEL course with ELITE Grade on “Conduction and Convection Heat Transfer”
  • VENKATAJALAPATHI T, Assistant Professor (Sr.Grade) of Mechanical Department has completed NPTEL course with Silver Grade on “Conduction and Convection Heat Transfer”
  • PRAKASH K, Assistant Professor of Mechanical Department has completed NPTEL course successfully on “IC Engines and Gas Turbines”
  • KAUSHIK.V.S, Assistant Professor of Mechanical Department has completed NPTEL course with ELITE Grade on “Principles of Casting Technology”
  • PRAKASH T, Associate Professor of Mechanical Department has completed NPTEL course with ELITE Grade on “Principles of Casting Technology”
  • NATARAJAN A, Associate Professor of Mechanical Department has completed NPTEL course with Silver Grade on “Principles of Casting Technology”
  • MOHAMED ARIFFUDDEEN M, Associate Professor of Mechanical Department has completed NPTEL course with ELITE Grade on “Product Design and Development”
  • P.DIVYAKUMAR, Assistant Professor of Mechanical Department has completed NPTEL course with ELITE Grade on “Product Design and Development”
  • G.THARANITHARAN, Assistant Professor of Mechanical Department has completed NPTEL course successfully on “Introduction To Composites”
  • Sindhu Kavi M, Assistant Professor of Mechanical Department has completed NPTEL course with Silver Grade on “Design Thinking – A Primer”
  • NATARAJAN A, Associate Professor of Mechanical Department has completed NPTEL course with Silver Grade on “Design Thinking – A Primer”
  • M.SUBRAMANIAN, Professor of Mechanical Department has completed NPTEL course with Silver Grade on “Design Thinking – A Primer”
  • PRAKASH T, Associate Professor of Mechanical Department has completed NPTEL course with Silver Grade on “Design Thinking – A Primer”
  • SOMU C, Assistant Professor of Mechanical Department has completed NPTEL course with Silver Grade on “Design Thinking – A Primer”
  • KARTHICK U, Assistant Professor of Mechanical Department has completed NPTEL course with Silver Grade on “Design Thinking – A Primer”
  • M.SUBRAMANIAN, Professor of Mechanical Department has completed NPTEL course successfully on “Patent drafting for Beginners”
  • M.SUBRAMANIAN, Professor of Mechanical Department has completed NPTEL course with Silver Grade on “Engineering Mechanics – Statics and Dynamics”
  • P Madhu, Associate Professor of Mechanical Department has completed NPTEL course successfully on “Design Thinking – A Primer”
  • C Sowmya Dhanalakshmi, Associate Professor of Mechanical Department has completed NPTEL course successfully on “Design Thinking – A Primer”

STUDENT PROGRESSION

Every student right from the first year are given personal care through tailored activities with a specially assigned mentor. Talent search and personality identification of each student is done at large and they are taught, trained, challenged and guided in a systematic progression. From the first year onwards, students are encouraged and guided to be globally competent through various competition and challenging forums. The capable students are also given the opportunity to customise the courses that they learn by hand picking electives. There are also means by which the student can even choose who would teach a specific course to increase the faculty-student interaction and understanding. Through personal mentorship programme, each student is given special and individual care to help them grow and mature in academic, social and personal skills and talents. At the end of the four years, it is made sure that every student progress in systematic, customized and challenging manner in all need knowledge and skills to sets.

The student progression is monitored by keeping a record of all the activities like attendance & assessment for each course by the respective faculty. Apart from the mentoring system, the students’ progress is monitored through class tests, online quizzes, assignments, development of teaching material for specific topics, submission of journal abstracts of current status of the technology, by making them attend conferences/seminar/webinars on relevant topics. This exercise makes them involve themselves and makes them proceed beyond communication barriers, rural/ urban background and get a sense of team work. Slow and fast learners are identified and special work or coaching are given.

DEMO MODELS

  • A Demo Model for the DESIGN AND FABRICATION OF WHEEL CHAIR – STRETCHER MODEL FOR  HOSPITAL APPLICATIONS BY USING PNEUMATICS by  NavaneethaKrishnan,  S.Peter Ashwin Ronald,  Samuel Arya, M.Sankamesh,  S.M.Franklin guided by Dr.C.Sowmya Dhanalakshmi, AP/Mech for the event National Science and Technology Fair conducted at Codissia Trade Fair Complex From 29th August 2019 to 31st August – Participated
  • A Demo Model on Shafts for Design of Machine Elements by Mr. G.Tharanitharan, AP/Mech
  • A Demo Model on Couplings for Design of Machine Elements by Mr. G.Tharanitharan, AP/Mech
  • A Demo Model on Springs for Design of Machine Elements by Mr. G.Tharanitharan, AP/Mech
  • A Demo Model on Welded Specimen for Engineering Practices by Mr. G.Tharanitharan, AP/Mech
  • Flywheel for Design of Machine Elements by Mr. G.Tharanitharan, AP/Mech
  • Gear Drives for Design of Transmission Systems by Mr. G.Tharanitharan, AP/Mech
  • A Demo Model on Gear Drives for Design of Transmission Systems by Mr. G.Tharanitharan, AP/Mech
  • A Demo Model on Bearings for Design of Machine Elements by Mr. G.Tharanitharan, AP/Mech
  • A Demo Model on Shafts for Design of Machine Elements by Mr. G.Tharanitharan, AP/Mech
  • A Demo Model on Couplings for Design of Machine Elements by Mr. G.Tharanitharan, AP/Mech
  • Demo Model of Prism, Pyramid, Cone, Cylinder for Engineering Drawing & Graphics by Mr. G.Tharanitharan, AP/Mech
  • Reciprocating Pump for Fluid Mechanics by Dr.B.Ashokkumar, Prof./Mech
  • A Demo Model on Four bar , Crank and Slideer Mechanism for Dynamics of Machinery by Mr.B.Karthik, AP/Mech
  • A Demo Model on Governor Mechanism for Dynamics of Machinery by Mr.B.Karthik, AP/Mech
  • A Demo Model on Robotic Arm by Mr.K.Praksh, ASP/Mech
  • A Demo Model on Pump for Fluid Mechanics by Dr.B.Ashokkumar, Prof./Mech
  • A Demo Model on Coupling Mechanism Mr.B.Karthik, AP/Mech
  • A Demo Model on Smart Table model for Manufacturing by Mr.U.Karthik, AP/Mech
  • A Demo Model on Innovative Trash Can by Mr.R.Karthikeyan, AP/Mech
  • A Demo Model on Cube for Engineering Drawing & Graphics by Mr. G.Tharanitharan, AP/Mech
  • A Demo Model on Fish Food Dispenser in fisheries by Mr.K.Praksh, ASP/Mech
  • A Demo Model on Speed Limit and Sign Board Indicator by Mr.K.Praksh, ASP/Mech
  • Demo on Energy Audit by Mr.K.Praksh, ASP/Mech
  • Demo on Six Sigma practices by Mr.K.Praksh, ASP/Mech
  • A Demo Model on Solar Energy Bulb for Solar Energy Utilization by Mr.K.Praksh, ASP/Mech
  • A Demo Model on Filteration Unit by Mr.B.K.Saravanan,AP/Mech
  • A Demo Model on Steam Nozzle for Engineering Thermodynamics by Dr.P.Madhu, ASP/Mech
  • A Demo Model on Radiator for Renewable Energy by Dr.P.Madhu, ASP/Mech
  • Demo model on Solar Collector by Mr.K.Praksh, ASP/Mech
  • A Demo Model on Steam Turbine for Engineering Thermodynamics by Dr.P.Madhu, ASP/Mech
  • A Demo Model on Compact Flourescent Lamp for Solar Energy Utilization by Mr.K.Praksh, ASP/Mech
  • A Demo Model on Crank and Lever Mechanism for Kinematics of Machiinery by Dr.T.Prakash, Prof/Mech
  • A Demo Model on Four Bar Mechanism for Kinematics of Machiinery by Dr.T.Prakash, Prof/Mech
  • A Demo Model on Linkage Mechanism for Kinematics of Machiinery by Dr.T.Prakash, Prof/Mech

MINI PROJECTS

  • “A mini project on “”Design and fabrication of pantographic mechanism”.

One of the major problems during sheet metal working is cutting of large and complex shapes on the sheet metal. This is due to errors and involvement of large process and equipment’s in drawing those shapes, like drawing a circle with big diameter is very difficult (Range of compass is 300mm diameter). Drawing a complex shape on sheet metal needs a scale, protector, compass, drafter etc., and for some shapes like parabola and ellipse, we do not have the equipment to draw. But a similar shape on a smaller scale is easier to draw in software like AutoCAD and solid works and can easily take print out for the smaller scale. If the same drawing can be magnified, the difficulty in drawing the complex shapes on sheet metal can be minimized. Therefore, this project is aimed at developing a Pantograph mechanism, which can be used to magnify the smaller shapes on the sheet metals. And it replaces all the drawing tools on the work table. Another use of this mechanism is a single reference drawing is enough to draw a similar magnified drawing on many sheet metals.”

  • “A mini project on “”Design and fabrication of pneumatic can crushing machine”

A can crusher is a pneumatic device which is used for squashing food and beverage cans to save space for recycling. … To design the pneumatic part of a can crusher and to fabricate the pneumatic part of the system is the step to learn pneumatic engineering.”

  • “A mini project on “”Design and fabrication of pendulum based power generation”

The main scope of our project explains the solution for hand pump by saving the energy. It is easy enough to move pendulum with the finger instead of large swings where it saves the human effort. The study explains the effect of creating the free energy in the device made of a) Oscillating pendulum lever system b) The system for initiating and maintaining the oscillation of the pendulum c) System which uses the energy of the device by damping the oscillations of the lever. Due to the pendulum oscillation the linear movement is obtained in the lever which is connected to the piston. So that the movement of piston from higher head to lower head is pumping the water from the sump. Based on the oscillation the vertical movement varies and also the outlet of the water varies. Creo Free energy pendulum oscillation pumps.”

  • “A mini project on “”Design and fabrication of Metal Bending operation”

Hydraulic hand operated work piece bending is a machine which is used for bending the rod or work piece manually. By using hydraulic energy the pipe bending process can be carried out. This project is designed with Hydraulic bottle jack and roller. ”

  • “A mini project on “”Design and afbrication of power generation using electromagnetic suspension”

The power generator electromagnetic suspension system is a system that converts vehicle bump generated linear motion & vibration, into electricity to be used in battery charging. General vehicle shock absorbers are used to simply absorb this energy without converting it to electricity. So here we put forth a way to use this free energy and store it for further needs such as vehicle lights, cooling, indicator lights etc. To achieve this we here use the principles of electromagnetism in order to generate electricity from this motion. Our shock absorber is made up of a metal shaft, spring, magnet, coils, base with screws and joints. It uses a coil wound around in particular turning arrangement over the inner beam of the part. ”

  • “A mini project on “”Design and fabrication of fuel level indicator and fuel theft alarm”

Today’s world need digital techniques for measurement of any quantity conventional fuel meter are analog so that we trying to make it digitized to show the fuel value digitally. In our project we show the amount of fuel present in fuel tank digitally i.e. 1lits, 1.5lits, 2lits etc. Also fuel theft is measure problem in all over world. In our project if fuel gets theft then text message will send to owner of bike also buzzer makes noise so that owner of bike get aware. In traditional vehicle system such kind of system not implemented like display fuel availability digitally & fuel theft of bike can be avoided.”

  • “A mini project on “”Design and fabrication of tilting vice”

In these modern days, the humans like to do all the works within a certain time with fast and effectively. At the same time, the job should be fulfilling the requirement. The drawbacks of earlier system are overcome the existing system. In the existing system, the radial drilling machine can be used to drill the fixed job with higher efficiency. But it cannot rotate or tilt the job at particular angle. These drawback are overcomes by proposed system. Design and fabrication of the rotating and tilting machine vice can be operated by using mechanical linkage such as bevel gears and shaft. By the use of bevel gear, we can achieve the rotation motion.”

  • “A mini project on “”Design and fabrication of thermo-electric refrigeration”

Refrigeration is the process of removal of heat from a body at lower temperature and sending it to surroundings. The present day refrigeration devices use refrigerant gases like Freons to do refrigeration which result in release of CFCs in to atmosphere which thereby result in depletion of ozone layer. But by using Thermo electric refrigeration this impact can be reduced. This project deals with design, fabrication and analysis of Thermo electric refrigerator. This refrigerator contains thermoelectric modules, Switched mode power supply equipment, Heat sinks, exhaust fans and temperature controlling switches. This project also includes the analysis of this refrigerator. Thermo electrics has a lot of scope in refrigeration, electric generators etc.”

  • “A mini project on “”Design and fabrication of Beam engine mechanism powered circular saw machine”

A beam engine mechanism is one where we use an overhead beam to create motion. Here we use a beam engine motion based assembly in order to achieve hack saw cutting motion using a circular cutting disc. Our system uses a motorized disc to drive a connector which is inturn connected to an overhead beam. The overhead bean has a connecting rod in turn connected to a mini hacksaw blade. When the motorized disc below is turned on the connecting arm starts reciprocating the overhead beam. This beam now heals achieve a back and forth cutting motion as required by the hacksaw blade. We construct a small bed in order to rest the work piece to achieve desired cutting. Thus we study the design and fabrication of mini hacksaw using beam engine mechanism.”

  • “A mini project on “”Design and fabrication of automatic hand brake releasing system”

Hand Brake Realise for Ignition and Clutch Based System” is nothing but one of the hand breaking systems in automobile at the time of vehicle switch off condition. In this breaking system hand brake lever attached the pneumatic cylinder operated one. In this project, the control unit is received the signal from the key switch. The key switch is ‘ON’ at the time of vehicle start condition. The first time clutch is applied so that the solenoid valve on and pneumatic cylinder is actuation in forward direction for 2 sec to release the break (Already wheel is on braking condition). The key switch is ‘OFF’ the solenoid valve is off and pneumatic cylinder actuation in reward direction for 2 sec to applying the break.”

  • “A mini project on “”Design and fabrication of door open and close during slider crank mechanism”

The invention relates to a slider-crank mechanism principle-based opening and closing mechanism, which comprises a power source pushing cylinder, a crank sliding mechanism and a connecting mechanism connected with a front end fairing, wherein the crank sliding mechanism comprises a crank connecting rod and a sliding mechanism; one end of the crank connecting rod is fixedly connected to a fixed part of the sliding mechanism, and the other end of the crank connecting rod is hinged with the connecting mechanism; a sliding part of the sliding mechanism is hinged with the connecting mechanism; one end of the power source pushing cylinder is fixedly arranged on the fixed part of the sliding mechanism, and the other end of the power source pushing cylinder is connected with the sliding part of the sliding mechanism;”

  • “A mini project on “”Design and fabrication of Pneumaticf power hammer”

The forging hammers are fixed at the end of the pneumatic cylinder piston rod. The pneumatic cylinder is operated through the pneumatic energy (air). The air stored in a compressor the compressed air is passed to the pneumatic cylinder with the help of the solenoid valve.”

  • “A mini project on “”Design and fabrication of low cost automation of pump efficiency”

 In today’s modern world we humans are in need of the products which are easy to use and readily available .One of them are, the disposable material .The concept of disposables came into existence in late 19th century where the various number of food packaging and storage components were invented, and now there are vast variety of products available in the market with ample usage. Paper plate is one such commodity which is widely used by people for a variety of purpose also they are non-hazardous to the environment. Simple punch and die techniques are used for the production of these plates. But now a days various other mechanisms are used which are more efficient and provide us the material with remarkable rate of production .But one of the few shortcoming of these machines is regarding their high cost which is due to their major advanced mechanisms. Therefore, a small approach towards the solution for the problem, this project comprise of one such machine which is constructed through simple mechanisms like belt-pulley, gears, etc. with a promising production rate at a reasonable cost .success on this project will provide us with a machine which can improve the market of the paper plate making machine and can become a source of employment.”

  • A mini project on “”Design and fabrication of scissor lift”

Conventionally a scissor lift or jack is used for lifting a vehicle to change a tire, to gain access to go to the underside of the vehicle, to lift the body to appreciable height, and many other applications. A Scissor lift is the type platform that can usually move vertically. This mechanism is achieved by the use of link, folding support in crisscross pattern known as a Pantograph. The upward motion is achieved by the application of pressure to outside of the lowest set of support elongating the crossing pattern and propelling the work platform vertically. This paper describes the complete study of components (hydraulic cylinder, scissor arms, spacing shaft and platform), selection of materials and analyzes the dimensions of components along with their sketches with the help of design software CATIA V5 followed by stress analysis on COMSOL. Further fabrication of all the parts and assembly is carried out.”

  • “A mini project on “”Design and fabrication of automatic motorized parallel bar feeding machine”

 In today’s industries, several types of machines are present that can cut single bar at a time. Though single bar cutting machine also differs to its size and shape. Today automation and increase in production rate is main step companies are undertaking for faster and cheaper production. Recently during project work we have seen a machine that can cut a bar (100mm diameter) with automatic feeding and cutting, but machine we have designed can cut three bars at a time and design of this is unique. This Project gives the information regarding the design of the machine and its working. For automatic bar cutting, Holding and feeding operation Hydraulic cylinders are used. Basic view of this Project is to in increase Production rate.”

  • “A mini project on “”Design and fabrication of butter making machine”

 Butter is essentially the fat of the milk. It is usually made from sweet cream and is salted. However, it can also be made from acidulated or bacteriologically soured cream and saltless (sweet) butters are also available. Well into the 19th century butter was still made from cream that had been allowed to stand and sour naturally. The cream was then skimmed from the top of the milk and poured into a wooden tub. Buttermaking was done by hand in butter churns. The natural souring process is, however, a very sensitive one and infection by foreign micro-organisms often spoiled the result. Today’s commercial buttermaking is a product of the knowledge and experience gained over the years in such matters as hygiene, bacterial acidifying and heat treatment, as well as the rapid technical development that has led to the advanced machinery now used. The commercial cream separator was introduced at the end of the 19th century; the continuous churn had been commercialized by the middle of the 20th century.”

  • “A mini project on “”Design and fabrication of motorized screw jack”

 Fabrication of a motorized screw jack is easy especially when the parts are avaialble in the market. This mechanical engineering project can be easily completed by integrating an electric motor with a screw jack. A screw jack or a Jackscrew is operated by turning a lead screw. The height of the jack is adjusted by turning the lead screw. This can be done either manually or by integrating an electric motor with it. This integration is our project.”

  • “A mini project on “”Design and Fabrication of Automatic Flame OFF”

 This paper attempts to integrate microcontrollers into smoke detector circuitry and other components for safety purpose. This can be achieved by placing some sensors and devices in the building. In the proposed system, a smoke detector upon senses smoke activates its alarm, sends a low voltage signal to microcontrollers. The microcontroller will activate the relays which are connected to other components to alert residents that one of the smoke detectors has sensed smoke by means of voice and flashing lights. At the same time, it will send signals to valves, air suckers and the water pump. The solenoid valve will operate the water pump which delivers water to the room through pipes installed inside the building to attack the fire. Meanwhile, the air sucker will suck the smoke from the room to prevent suffocation. The proposed design is aiming to have cost efficient system, compact design, easily expandable, simple to install and replaceable components.”

  • “A mini project on “”Design and Fabrication of Groundnut Harvester”

 The most of land in India is use for the purpose of agriculture since the origin of humanity groundnuts is highly cultivated. It is rich in protein and oil and has a large energy value. The groundnut is used as a food and cooking oil. At present there is lock of workers in the field of agriculture .Harevesting of groundnut is a major problem people go for other sources of oil extraction .those oils various effect on health of human being. To overcome issues, it is decided to design a groundnut harvesting machine will be sample in operation more economical one and can be handled easily in our agricultural fields .this project describes about the design &fabrication of a simple groundnut harvesting machine.

  • “A mini project on “”Design and fabrication of height adjustable ceiling fan”

The fabrication of this product started with surveying in market about the product, specification analysis, concept designing, detail concept designing and fabrication of the product. Four (4) products were selected from the market for the analysis and investigation. One types of the product that suitable and fit all the specification was chosen to fabricate. The investigation was made in scope of the constraint that may occur for the development of the product and relevance of the product manufacturing processes. This product have been fabricate according to engineering method through many fabrication process such as welding, cutting, drilling and assembling. For development of this project and future works, some suggestion was made for upgrading the product. The suggestion like dust case and more durable of the holder to make sure this product will competitive with the existing products in the market”

  • “A mini project on “Gearless power transmission”

 Power transmission for skew shafts is with the help of either crossed helical gear or worm gear or hypoid gears in a machine, but the manufacturing of these gear is very complex, power loss in gears due to sliding motion and the shaft orientations is very limited, so need arises for a better system. In Gearless power transmission for skew shafts which reduce the losses, cost & save the time and space. This system allows the changing in the orientation of shafts during motion which is very interesting and fascinating about this mechanism”

  • “A mini project on “”Design and fabrication of free energy generation using bearings”

In today’s world due to ever increasing health consciousness and fitness the idea of building manual treadmill arises with some extra modification in the existing treadmill and with this, effort loss during exercise is also used for purpose of generation of electricity including a controller display circuit for showing parameters like timer, speed, distance, pulse rate and calories. With the provision of AC motor to the manual treadmill by means of gear transmission mechanism, the power is harnessed from the legs of the person performing exercise to the belt which is then transferred to the roller then to the AC motor by means of gear-pinion arrangement and electrical power so obtained is stored in battery by converting the AC current to constant DC by accommodation of bridge rectifier circuit.”

  • “A mini project on “”Design and fabrication of motorised corn peeler””

Since there are more maize peeling techniques in India which are used in our day to day life. The main problems with these techniques are that they are getting more loss in production rate because of using old methods. So now day’s farmers are required to use the new techniques to increase the production rate and also reduce the man power. But these machines are not affordable to farmers who are having fewer amounts of farms and which not require these big machines. Many farmers in India not have lot of money to invest for purchasing the machines because of their cost. So most of the farmers are resort to use hand operated method or old methods which gives low profit, more damage of corn seeds from cob, which is very oasis work. Since inventions is going on machines which reduced the work for farmers and also provided the saving of cost. These machines are automatic operated, fuel consumption. So by sing the relation of man machine system which establish the simple mechanical design.”

  • “A mini project on “”Design and Fabrication of Manual plougher & seed sower”

Sowing machine should be suitable to all farms, all types of corps, robust construction, also is should be reliable, this is basic requirement of sowing machine. Thus we made sowing machine which is operated manually but reduces the efforts of farmers thus increasing the efficiency of planting also reduces the problem encountered in manual planting. For this machine we can plant different types and different sizes of seeds also we can vary the space between two seeds while planting. This also increased the planting efficiency and accuracy. We made it from raw materials thus it was so cheap and very usable for small scale farmers. For effective handling of the machine by any farmer or by any untrained worker we simplified its design. Also its adjusting and maintenance method also simplified.”

  • “A mini project on “”Design and Fabrication of Emergency Doorlock Opening  in Car”

The safety locking system is designed to prevent accidents happening while opening the car door and to provide safety to passengers and pedestrians. To prevent accident due to passenger’s carelessness, in this planned to control the car door locking automatically using distance measuring system, child lock and ultrasonic sensors. Due to this passengers can’t open their car door from inside while object is moving towards the car. The entire system is controlled with the help of advanced microcontroller. In this proposed system it will be fitted with a distance measuring ultrasonic sensor in car rear view mirror on both sides. This sensor sends and receives the signal near the outer surface of the car door. Due to this if any object approaches the car, the signal get reflect and received by the receiver. Due to quick return of the signal, the microcontroller sends signal to the child lock and it get activates according to the program performed on the microcontroller. Due to this the passengers can’t open the car from inside, so sudden opening can be prevented. But we can open the car from outside. If the object/person moved then the signal passes long distance and the receiving time get increased, so the controller sends the signal to the lock and it comes back to its original position.”

  • “A mini project on “”Design and fabrication of  welding slag remover”

Welding slag is a form of vitreous material or slag produced as a byproduct of some arc welding processes, most specifically shielded metal arc welding, submerged arc welding, and Flux-cored arc welding. Slag is the leftover remains of the weld process that is a result of the flux having done its job. Slag is formed from the flux, decomposing into either a shielding gas, or deoxidizers, which form molten compounds that cover the weld while it cools to prevent oxidation of the freshly formed weld.”

  • “A mini project on “”Design and fabrication of power regeneration using suspension system”

All vehicles have suspension system. Only 26 % of the available fuel energy is used to drive the vehicle, i.e. to overcome the resistance from road friction. One important loss is the dissipation of vibration energy by shock absorbers in the vehicle suspension under the excitation of road irregularity and vehicle acceleration or deceleration. The suspension system mainly consist of a mechanical spring. The objective of this project is to design a vehicle suspension system which can harness the energy. In the present work, spring is a one type of suspension system that converts parasitic intermittent linear motion and vibration into useful energy, such as electricity. In our project, we used spring, rack & pinion arrangement and doubly fed induction generator. As shock absorber effect formed, spring is compressed and linear movement of rack is converted in rotary motion due to pinion moves as the rack is meshed with pinion.”

  • “A mini project on “”Design and fabrication of pneumatic rod bending machine”

It is proposed to replace the manual work and reduce time taken for bending by designing an alternative machine to replace the manual work which works by the principle of hydraulic system and indexing mechanism. This will reduce the time taken for bending operation and more than one rod can be bent at a same time. Bending can be done with required dimensions and accuracy is maintained during the entire operation. By changing the dimensions of the die required bents are made on the rods.”

  • “A mini project on “”Design and fabrication of power generation using rotating gate”

The setup for generation of power from revolving door mechanism was fabricated as per the design. The setup consists of 4 door panel system. About 10 to 15 rpm was obtained from the setup and a 12V 100rpm motor is used to demonstrate the output via compound gear train mechanism.”

  • “A mini project on “”Design and fabrication of bevel gear jack using motor”

With the increasing level of technology, researchers all over the world are working continuously to improve and implement better and robust design of materials at workplace for productivity, efficiency and effectiveness. Detailed design procedure of a quick lifting screw jack is presented in this paper. The design is fundamentally a modification of the conventional scissor jack. The problems associated with the conventional jacks are the ergonomic snags experienced by operators due to prolonged bending or squatting positions during operation. These problems of waist pain and backaches are as a result of continuous turning of the wrench or crank shaft in an uncomfortable position for a long period. These led to the design and modification of quick lifting screw jack with gear arrangements that are safe, reliable and capable of raising or lowering heavy load with little effort. The results showed that the introduction of the crank and gear mechanism would help reduce difficulty in operation, reduce time, increase efficiency and effectively control the difficulties concomitant with Ergonomics – which is an ultimate sensitivity in design process”

  • “A mini project on “”Design and fabrication of quick lifting jack using bevel gear “

The quick lift jack is a device used for lifting heavy loads by the application of much smaller force. … Jack arrangement i.e. lifting rod will be fixed to bevel gear. Clockwise rotation of handle, jack will rotates upward motion and anti clockwise rotation of handle, jack will rotates downward motion.”

  • “A mini project on “”Design and fabrication of solar pesticide sprayer”

Today’s energy demand is the great challenge for our society. Conventional energy (Fossil fuel, coal, Nuclear energy etc.) can be widely used in India for various purposes such as Textile industry, Power plant etc. Conventional energy produces a lot of harmful waste that can be harmful to our environment. In such situation we should move towards some non-conventional energy (Solar energy, Wind energy, Tidal energy) sources. It has become very popular for all kinds of development activities such as drying agriculture product, irrigation purpose and for spraying purpose”

  • “A mini project on “”PNEUMATIC OF SHEET METAL CUTTER”

Cutting process is involved in almost every industrial process. So here we propose a pneumatic based cutting machine that uses pneumatic strength for instant cutting of small sheets and pipes. Manual cutting machines require a lot of manual effort and also are not suitable for bulk cutting processes with accuracy. The pneumatic cutting machine ensures exact cutting speed each time to get the consistent cutting result without any break. The machine consists of a pneumatic cylinder fabricated with a linking joint attached to it. ”

  •  “A mini project on “”Design and fabrication of automatic side stand retrieve system”

 The new system“AUTOMATIC SIDE- STAND RETRIEVE SYSTEM” is designed based on the working principle of bikes. Since all bike transmit power from engine to rear wheel by means of chain drive. Since designed setup is kept in between chain drive, setup rotates and side stand get retrieves automatically.”

  • “A mini project on “”Design and fabrication of plant trimmer “

The mechanical part of the machine consists of lead screw, journal bearing and cutter blade. High strength lead screw is used to eliminate the thrust. The cutter blade is designed to rotate at high speed. The electrical system of the machine contains wiper motor and inductive type proximity sensor.”

INDUSTRY CASE STUDY

  • B. Ashok Kumar, Prof./Mech;Case study on “The application of acoustic emission for detecting incipient of a 60 kW centrifugal pump”;Pump Industries;Pumps are used in most of our domestic and industrial applications. From the data collected from the cavitation is a serious problem encountered in hydraulic pumps. It is essential to detect the incipient of cavitation to avoid it. Once the incipient of cavitation is found, by changing the rotational speed of the centrifugal pump or flow rate, formation of cavitation can be avoided. Detecting the incipient of the cavitation is a very big challenge. This case study “Acoustic emission (AE) technique has been applied for detecting cavitation occurred in the centrifugal pump. A series of performance Tests and NPSH tests were conducted on a two stage ‘David Brown’ 60 kW centrifugal pump (Model DB22) with a maximum capacity of 204 m3/h at an efficiency of 70.6%. Acoustic emission sensors were located at various points. Observations of AE r.m.s. activity during the performance test are displayed. During the performance test, AE activity from the sensor located in the vicinity of impeller on pump casing was found to have the largest magnitude among the magnitude of AE received from other sensors which were fixed on other points as mentioned earlier. Hence, the sensor fixed in the impeller eye position is the best position for correlating AE activity to predict the pump performance. It was observed that the minimum AE r.m.s. value was obtained for a flow rate of 94.5 m3/h.  At this flow rate the AE activity generated from the fluid flow within the pump and pipes was lowest in comparison to other flow rates. Either side of this flow rate resulted in increasing AE r.m.s. activity with increased flow rates. Based on these observations it was concluded that the best efficiency point (BEP) must occur where there was minimal flow turbulence in the system, and hence minimum AE activity. A total of three NPSH tests were undertaken at flow rates of 101, 141 and 180 m3/h, As with the performance tests, the best AE signature response was located on the pump casing in the vicinity of the impeller eye and other sides also. At a flow rate of 101 m3/h an increase of 165% in AE r.m.s. levels was observed from an NPSH value of 8.2 to 7 m. Relatively constant levels continued until an NPSH of 5.8 m. then a rapid decrease in AE r.m.s. levels was noticed. With further reductions in NPSH, spikes in AE r.m.s. signal response were observed as the 3% drop in head was reached. Same pattern of  AE levels was noticed from the sensors fixed in the suction and discharge flanges. The results from acoustic emission analysis have shown a clear relationship between AE activity measured from the pump casing, suction and discharge pipes, and incipient cavitation. At a relatively high NPSH value, when incipient cavitation is known to occur, an increase in AE r.m.s. levels was observed. However, as cavitation developed there is a reduction in AE r.m.s. levels due to attenuation of AE. Hence, it is suggested that the AE technique is more suitable to detect incipient of cavitation.
  • “Dr. B. Ashok Kumar, Prof./ Mech; Analysing hydro abrasive erosion in Kaplan turbine; Chilla hydroelectric plant ;In this case study Erosion of turbine components are addressed. Erosion is one of the serious problem encountered in hydraulic turbines. Sediment flow through hydro turbine causes erosion of hydraulic components resulting in drop of turbine efficiency. Particularly in hydropower plants of the Himalayan region. The sediment flow causes reduction in the active life of reservoirs, increase the erosion of hydro-mechanical equipment and civil engineering structures in the plant. The following methods are currently used to overcome sediment erosion related failures:Removal of sediments, Development of erosion resistant alloys, Coatings of the components, and Optimization of hydraulic design of the components.The measurement of erosion and monitoring of sediment flow in turbine are major concerns in erosion study. The hydro abrasive erosion due to sediment laden water is a complex process and depends on many factors such as sediment characteristics, flow characteristics and properties of substrate materials that is hardness, surface morphology, properties of the coating on the turbine blades and hub. Erosion measurements in prototype plants are difficult due to large sized and non-flat components. An ultrasonic thickness measurement device operating on resonance principle was used to measure the thickness of turbine components before and after repair. In order to create reference points for the measurements all the six turbine blades of a unit were divided into grid cells drawn with paint before repair and then, the remaining grid lines after repair were connected to get the initial grid lines. In the present study, a run-of-river hydropower plant, scheme Chilla hydropower plant in foothills of Himalaya is considered for erosion study. The objective of this case study is to present a simple approach to measure the erosion on the turbine blades, the runner chamber and the draft tube cone of a prototype Kaplan turbine unit. During maintenance of turbine, an ultrasonic thickness measurement device operating on resonance principle was used to measure the thickness of turbine components before and after repair. A total of 4 readings of thickness were recorded in each 25 grid cells on pressure side surface of a blade, both before and after repair. The thickness measurements were performed on 6 turbine blades with 100 measuring points on each. The numbers of thickness measurement inside a grid cell were averaged to obtain a single value of erosion depth inside a grid cell. The erosion depth of a blade was obtained by averaging erosion depth of grid cells in two zones–trailing side and tip side. Cell A1 was the most severely affected due to erosion. The past experience revealed that the cell A1 was even removed due to erosion and cracking. It is found that the maximum and minimum values of erosion depth in different parts of runner chamber. It is clear that the most severely affected parts of the runner chamber were the upper cone and middle cone, whereas the MS cone was least affected. As MS cone zone has diverging shape, it less prone to erosion. The convergent shape and proximity to turbine blades turbulence increased the erosion of middle cone. Other three zones, i.e., upper cone, lower cone and compensating cone were cylindrical in shape. The erosion in the upper cone was higher due to turbulence created by the nearby turbine blades. The measured sediment concentration values throughout the year revealed that a maximum concentration of 3.6 g/l and 5.3 g/l passed through turbine blades in 2007 and 2009 respectively. It was found that 47% of the sediment load passed through only 20 days in 2007 in the hydropower plant. The corresponding values in 2009 were even higher, i.e., 49.2% of the sediment load in just 12 days. The other major finding is that the runner chamber portion near the turbine blade is susceptible to erosion, hence erosion resistant material must be used for this region. The results suggested that high erosion producing sediment concentration have passed through within a few days of the year. The operation of plant can be adjusted during these days to reduce erosion.”
  • B. Ashok Kumar, Prof./Mech;Case study on “Detection of Cavitation Phenomena in Reciprocating Pumps using a High-Speed Camera”;Pump Industries;The very fast generation and collapsing of vapor bubbles are not visible to the naked eye. Therefore, the detection of cavitation phenomena has to be performed optically by a high-speed camera. Additionally, the pump was equipped with several pressure sensors to obtain detailed knowledge of the pressure evolution. The experimental investigation of the occurring cavitation phenomena was performed using a horizontal single-acting plunger pump. To observe the generation and the back formation of cavitation in the working chamber and at the suction side valve, the pump was equipped with several pressure-resistant inspection windows. Because of the inspection windows, it is possible to capture the cavitation phenomena with a high-speed camera with a frame rate of up to 100,000 frames per second. Basically, the cavitation types are categorized into three cavitation conditions: incipient cavitation, partial cavitation and full cavitation. Incipient Cavitation: At the beginning of the suction stroke, the working chamber time plot exceeds the vapor pressure for a very short time. This form is called incipient cavitation. The reason for this is the under pressure spike during the opening of the suction side valve. Generally, it can be said that the bubbles in the working chamber are strictly caused by volume expansion. Partial cavitation: If you lower the suction side pressure or increase the plunger speed, you proceed from the condition of incipient cavitation to the condition of partial cavitation. After the under pressure spike during the opening of the valve, the pressure in the working chamber remains nearly constant at the level of the vapor pressure. Therefore, cavitation bubbles will be generated at the beginning of the suction stroke and collapse due to certain pressure conditions. The volume of the vapor cavities of advanced cavitation is increased in comparison to incipient cavitation. Partial cavitation is characterized by complete bubble degeneration at the latest end of the suction stroke. Full Cavitation: When the vapor cavities are degenerated at the beginning of the discharge stroke, this condition is called full cavitation. Very high pressure surges have to be expected and, additionally, a loss of efficiency has to be suspected. Thus, this cavitation condition has to be avoided. A study has been made on the detection of cavitation phenomena in a reciprocating positive displacement pump A high-speed camera was used to capture the occurring cavitation phenomena such as the very fast generation and collapse of cavities. cavitation in reciprocating positive displacement pumps seems harmless and unable to generate damages at the suction valve and in the working chamber. This led to the opinion that cavitation up to certain level is not harmful
  • P. Divyakumar, AP/Mech;Case study on Ambassador car; This case is based on ‘product re-launch strategy’ under Strategic Management. Various strategies are discussed in this case which will make us aware in brief about the various business strategies. Management students will clear many of their concepts and will enhance their knowledge about various business strategies currently used in the industry for business growth as well as to re-enter the market. Management faculties can also use this case while discussing various strategies in their class. This case is based on the decision of the HM management when it decided to relaunch the Ambassador car. It highlight the reasons which compelled the company to take this decision, and it also talks about the views of market analyst’s that making cosmetic changes the company will not be able to make any mark in this stiff competitive scenario. The case also talks about the strengths and weaknesses of company and the brand.
  • “Mr. P. Divyakumar, AP/Mech;Case study on Demand vs Supply; All markets have a supply and a demand side, leading to an equilibrium price and quantity. The supply and demand of products is a key concept in economics. Briefly, the law of supply and demand states that the availability of a product (supply) and its desire (demand) has a direct effect on the price. Accordingly, if the supply is low and demand is high, prices are high and vice versa. This law is true for most products in the market which can be applied in most market-relevant case interviews. In a perfect market, demand and supply co-incide at a zero-profit price. A perfect market has the following characteristics:
    • All goods of a kind are equal (e.g., commodities).
    • No transaction costs exist (e.g., taxes, cost to negotiate a contract and to change a supplier).
    • Many competitors exist.
    • Everyone has the same information.
  • For each of the two market participants, consumer and a producer, it is assumed that:
    • The lower the price for a product, the more consumers can afford it and want to buy it.
    • The lower the price for a product, the fewer producers want to sell it, as the profits are lower.
  • “Mr. P. Divyakumar, AP/Mech;Case study on Fiat currency vs cryptocurrency; A Cryptocurrency (or crypto currency) is a digital asset designed to work as a medium of exchange using cryptography to secure the transactions and to control the creation of additional units of the currency.
  • Both a cryptocurrency and an electronic payment system
    • Satoshi Nakamoto in 2008
    • First decentralised payment network
    • System is peer-to-peer
    • 21 million bitcoins
    • Completely Open source
    • 1BTC = $1258.48
  • Cryptocurrency is an impressive technical achievement, but it remains a monetary experiment. Even if cryptocurrencies survive, they may not fully displace fiat currencies. As I have tried to show in this presentation, they provide an interesting new perspective from which to view economic questions surrounding currency governance, the characteristics of money, the political economy of financial intermediaries, and the nature of currency competition.
  • “Mr. P. Divyakumar, AP/Mech;Case study on Concurrent vs Sequential Engineering; Traditional engineering, also known as sequential engineering.
  • It is the process of Marketing, Engineering design, Manufacturing
  • Testing and Production where each stage of the development process is carried out separately, and the next stage cannot start until the previous stage is finished. Advantages of sequential engineering
  • Easy to track progress and understand the requirements of the project and processes
  • It is well defined for each team member or department. Simple to understand and avoids misinterpretation It is an imposed discipline approach which takes away any misunderstanding Limitations of sequential engineering Increased product cycle time
  • Change requests from others in the latter stages are often very expensive and difficult to manage Without staged feedback. Final unit cost not economically viable. Concurrent engineering, also known as simultaneous engineering, is a method of designing and developing products, in which the different stages run simultaneously, rather than consecutively.
  • It decreases Product development time, Time to market, Improved productivity, Reduced costs.
  • V. Gopalakrishnan, AP/Mech; Polar Satellite Launch Vehicle ; With the ideas and suggestions listed above in the study it is clear that ISRO will have great and important role to play in the future of space exploration and rocket development. PSLV today is its greatest weapon/asset to showcase around the world, the development and current scenario of Indian research. NASA is a body which is into existence since long time and has been given a lot of grants and has best technical experts with them , whereas on the other hand ISRO is politically influenced in its choices and lacks good research facilities. It must also be noted that development of a newer rocket system must be on the charts but the current PSLV must not be discarded completely and important experiences from its flights and machines must be taken from it and used in the future flights. The GSLV and GSLV MK-III,II under development are going to be the successors of the PSLV age of rockets. With such rockets in India’s fleet it will be very easy for us to have our monopoly over the expanding market. It is maybe hard to compete with Space agency like NASA and to expand your market but it is not impossible. We must strive hard to make this happen and play our crucial role in achieving all this. By continuous hard work one day ISRO will become one of the best space agency and not one of the best but rather ‘The Best’.
  • “Dr. V. Gopalakrishnan, AP/Mech; Cryogenic Rocket Engine; Forbes India; Cryogenic Rocket Engine is a simple engine based on laws of Cryogenic science & Newton’s 3rd law of motion.
  • Cryogenic Technology ensures the stability of fuel & by following Newtons 3rd law the trust is generated. These
  • two principles work hand in hand to make this engine a mega success of 20th& 21st Century. Also while
  • comparing Rocket engine with jet engine , thrust produced in rocket engine is outwards and that in the jet engine
  • is inwards. Hence this efficiency cannot be achieved by any other engine.
  • V. Gopalakrishnan, AP/Mech;Electric Vehicles;Mahindra Electric; The pace of development of battery technology, particularly in delivering low cost batteries with high cycling capacity will be a major influence on EV uptake by consumers. In terms of supporting grid integration of renewables in Ireland, the potential of EVs as a source of large-scale, distributed storage is limited by the seasonal and diurnal patterns of wind generation, and by day-to-day wind speed variability. Vehicle charging loads are likely to be reasonably consistent from day-to-day, but wind generation varies widely on this timescale. A key question is whether driver behaviour will be sufficiently responsive to demand side measures such as smart metering in order to provide a useful storage reservoir to the grid. Hybrid technology may offer a partial solution to this problem, as drivers could be encouraged to revert to fuel combustion on days of low wind power availability. Without strong demand side measures there is a risk that the combined load of EVs will not be controllable to the extent that it supports the increased penetration of variable renewable electricity
  • “Dr. V. Gopalakrishnan, AP/Mech;A Study on Foundry Sand; Shiv Minerals;In the No-Bake foundry process, sand is blended with a small amount of expensive ingredients including a chemical binder and catalyst in a high speed mixer. The ingredients begin a chemical reaction process of hardening when discharged from the mixer to the mold or core box. An important step in this process is to maintain consistent temperature of the sand before it is blended with the ingredients. If
  • the sand is too hot or too cold the amount of ingredients added has
  • to be adjusted, which can create inconsistencies in the castings quality as well as wasting expensive raw material
  • “Dr. P.Madhu, AsP/Mech; Making a renewable energy future a reality: Case study; NextEra Energy Partners;Fossil fuel combustion is the major source of greenhouse gas (OHG) emissions, largely in the form of carbon dioxide (CO~), accounting for 85 percent of current net anthropogenic CO2 emissions. Over the past 50 years, fossil fuel consumption has increased fivefold, from approximately 57 exajoules in 1937 to around 282 exajoules in 1988. Predominant among these fuels is the use of coal and oil, though natural gas use is projected to increase rapidly over the next few decades. If fossil fuel consumption continues to grow, a doubling of pre-industrial CO2 concentrations could occur as early as 2030, leading to a projected increase in the global average equilibrium temperature of 1.5 to 4.5°C.
  • In the past three years, a major international study under the auspices of the Inter-governmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) has largely confirmed the previous findings of a range of scientific assessments that a continuation of current fossil fuel and deforestation trends will likely increase global temperatures to unprecedented levels. The IPCC calculated that it would take a reduction in global CO2 emissions by 60 per cent to stabilise atmospheric concentrations.
  • P.Madhu, AsP/Mech;Renewable energy in the developing world- A Case study;Renewable technologies with exception to traditional biomass are often termed ‘modern renewables’. These include hydropower, solar, wind, geothermal and modern biofuel production (including modern forms of waste-to-biomass conversion). The change & mix of modern renewable consumption over the last 50 years is shown in the chart below. This is measured in terawatt-hours per year and can be viewed across a range of countries and regions. Globally, the world produced approximately 5.9 TWh of modern renewable energy in 2016. This represents a 5 to 6-fold increase since the 1960s. Here we see that hydropower remains the dominant form of modern renewables consumption, accounting for almost 70 percent. Despite absolute growth in production, hydropower’s share is, however, declining as other renewable technologies grow.
  • P.Madhu, AsP/Mech;Analysis of a Heat Engine: Case study; Ford Motors Ltd; A heat engine typically uses energy provided in the form of heat to do work and then exhausts the heat which cannot be used to do work. Thermodynamics is the study of the relationships between heat and work. The first law and second law of thermodynamics constrain the operation of a heat engine. The first law is the application of conservation of energy to the system, and the second sets limits on the possible efficiency of the machine and determines the direction of energy flow.Heat engines such as automobile engines operate in a cyclic manner, adding energy in the form of heat in one part of the cycle and using that energy to do useful work in another part of the cycle.A heat engine typically uses energy provided in the form of heat to do work and then exhausts the heat which cannot be used to do work. Thermodynamics is the study of the relationships between heat and work. The first law and second law of thermodynamics constrain the operation of a heat engine. The first law is the application of conservation of energy to the system, and the second sets limits on the possible efficiency of the machine and determines the direction of energy flow.
  • P.Madhu, AsP/Mech;Analysis of a Heat Engine: Case study; Ford Motors Ltd; A heat engine typically uses energy provided in the form of heat to do work and then exhausts the heat which cannot be used to do work. Thermodynamics is the study of the relationships between heat and work. The first law and second law of thermodynamics constrain the operation of a heat engine. The first law is the application of conservation of energy to the system, and the second sets limits on the possible efficiency of the machine and determines the direction of energy flow.Heat engines such as automobile engines operate in a cyclic manner, adding energy in the form of heat in one part of the cycle and using that energy to do useful work in another part of the cycle.A heat engine typically uses energy provided in the form of heat to do work and then exhausts the heat which cannot be used to do work. Thermodynamics is the study of the relationships between heat and work. The first law and second law of thermodynamics constrain the operation of a heat engine. The first law is the application of conservation of energy to the system, and the second sets limits on the possible efficiency of the machine and determines the direction of energy flow.
  • P.Madhu, AsP/Mech;Residential heat pump- A Case study ; Daikin Heat Pumps; A heat pump is a device that uses a small amount of energy to move heat from one location to another.The working fluid, in its gaseous state, is pressurized and circulated through the system by a compressor. On the discharge side of the compressor, the now hot and highly pressurized vapor is cooled in a heat exchanger, called a condenser, until it condenses into a high pressure, moderate temperature liquid. The condensed refrigerant then passes through a pressure-lowering device also called a metering device. This may be an expansion valve, capillary tube, or possibly a work-extracting device such as a turbine. The low-pressure liquid refrigerant then enters another heat exchanger, the evaporator, in which the fluid absorbs heat and boils. The refrigerant then returns to the compressor and the cycle is repeated
  • Sowmya, ASP/MECH;Logistics;Allcargo Logistics Ltd, part of the Avvashya Group, is a logistics firm headquartered in India. Its services comprise global multimodal transport operations (non-vessel-operating common carrier, less than container load, and full container load), pan India container freight stations, inland container depots, third-party logistics, warehousing, contract logistics and logistics parks. The company operates across more than 160 countries through more than 300 offices. In keeping with the growing demand for logistics parks and Grade-A warehouses, Allcargo Logistics has ventured into this segment to offer state-of-the-art warehousing and industrial real-estate solutions. With a number of strategically located logistics parks across India, all in varied stages of development, Allcargo is expanding its nationwide warehousing footprint and tapping into key industrial and consumption centres. Characterised by innovative engineering, quality infrastructure and amenities, compliance with stringent health and safety standards, the warehouses ensure high operational efficiency and enable customers to minimise logistics overheads. An optimised supply chain is essential to business success across sectors. Whether you need end-to-end supply chain management, or a customised solution to optimise your existing supply chain, just leave it to our team of experts. With our robust infrastructure, we help drive your business with a scalable supply chain that matches seasonal demands. Our expertise spans diverse domains like warehouse logistics for automotive, chemical, pharmaceutical, food, e-commerce and fashion and retail.
  • Sowmya, ASP/MECH;Logistics Costs; M/S MODERN GARMENTS, MUMBAI; (Mumbai Uni Nov 2003)M/s Modern Garments is the manufacturer of ladies and gents garments, such as tops, shirts, undergarments, etc. Their manufacturing technology is advanced and, at the same time, there are several players who have access to such latest technologies. The supply chain for M/s Modern Garments includes significant purchases of raw materials, stitching of garments, packaging of finished products and supply of goods to its customers. The logistics functions are the key competitive elements in the market. M/s Modern Garments is considering to take over the control over its inbound and outbound logistics functions. These have a direct bearing upon the inventories, reduction in the losses due to transit delays and improvement in transit time and service reliability. However, the company has to look into the cost implications of such changes. M/s Modern Garments have been the leader in the readymade shirts market in India for a number of years. After liberalization, they entered into a joint venture with a French company to expand its business in the area of trousers and T-shirts. Despite the new joint venture, M/s Modern Garments still continues to manufacture its shirts at Thane near Mumbai and has started a new state-of-art garment manufacturing plant at Pune in Maharashtra, to compete with other market players. The company has planned to undertake the distribution of garments made and packed in its plants at Navi Mumbai and Kalyan so as to retain the control over the design, quality and service channel of its products.
  • Sowmya, ASP/MECH;Marketing; SUPER DOLLS COMPANY, MUMBAI;Super Dolls is a toy manufacturing company which is in the business for the past two decades. The manufacturing unit is situated in Mumbai, while its sales and marketing are spread over a large geographical area, especially in the major cities across the country. Over the years, a number of competitors have sprung in the field. Far from child’s play, the company found that the toys’ sector is a tough business. Some of the problems faced by it are: There is a massive sale during the festival seasons. If the company’s product is delayed, the valuable market is missed. “Fashion” or “cult” status products influence the market. Any wrong decision in this matter, means loss of sales and build-up of unwanted inventory There are high marketing and promotional costs. If these programmes go out, the sales drop massively Any misjudge of the market can also mean closing down of the company The company has problems regarding stock holding at its distribution centers. This is mainly due to wrong inputs from feedbacks and improper surveys. The company relies mainly on hired fleet of road transport. The services are not up to the mark in terms of delivery schedules, safety of goods from pilferage/theft, and mishandling of product. Marketing strategies are far from adequate. They are not effective enough to counter the strategies adopted by the competitors. You are called upon by the management of Super Dolls to head their logistics operations.
  • Sowmya, ASP/MECH;Supply Chain Monitoring;FORD INDIA; Supply chain monitoring ford parts supply & logistics case study. roger merkle former manager, north american inventory planning department. voice of the customer high service levels managed inventories managed safety stock managed costs expediting, overtime voice of the customer (high inventories) (high safety stock) (high costs)expediting, overtime distribution (process-focused) stable fixed costs low inventory stable part mix stable schedules low transportation cost distribution high customer service stable fixed costs low inventory stable part mix stable schedules low transportation cost purchasing low purchase price (high inventory) (stable schedules) (long lead times) purchasing low purchase price low inventory flexible schedules short lead times supply reliable suppliers low inventories short lead times flexible transportation supply reliable suppliers (high inventories) (long lead times) flexible transportation sell returns deliver source (make) return. Analytical Data updated weekly, at best High levels of processing time variability + Forecast error over supply chain process = High safety stock levels Different cultures, processes and practices at each node Material expedited by teams of people at headquarters Highly Reactive – focus on backorders and blame assessment Increasing complex supply chain including external partners and sources as well as non traditional channels Metrics not aligned – Data not common Little ability to prioritize which actions are critical to the business requirements, Voluminous reports – both paper and electronic, Labor-intensive to collect Forecast accuracy and safety stock management
  • Sowmya, ASP/MECH;Lean Structure; Donald Cross Corporate; The process industry in Europe employs 6,8 million workers and yields more than €1.6 billion of total turnover, thus accounting for around 20% of workforce and income in the EU region. Being in the center of most industrial processes and having to deal with the strict Page 9 of 75 guidelines of Horizon 2020, regarding energy consumption and efficiency, while still under the rigid economic circumstances of the decade crisis, process industries need to approach a more sustainable mode of operation, reducing energy consumption and emissions while preserving high quality delivered. Managing Warehouses, Compliance, Lean Culture, New Global Logistics.ORG/ Local ,Sales & Operation Planning (S&OP), Process Harmonization To Improve Cost Efficiency, Delayering of Supply Chain 3-1, Consolidate Supplier Base & Transport Costs, Indirect Spend Optimization Project Start up With PMO, Measuring & Develop metrics to optimize logistics, Indirect, optimization projects with stakeholders/ Group Management – Americas logistics team “No I in team”,Compliance & Data transparency (create visibility creates control), Total Customer, Service Solutions/ Service Levels/ Frontline, Develop Warehousing KPI’s/ Benchmark, Transport spend report Air, Ocean, Domestic (Air Freight Spend), 3PL/ Freight Partners, QBR/Budget/ Service, Multiple Supplier Consolidation, Creating a Culture for Change Lean Management is focusing on the organization of all resources in a supply chain by eliminating non value-adding activities (waste) in order to achieve the optimal profitability.
  • Sowmya, ASP/MECH;Integrated supply chain strategy;THE CASE OF SPANISH FAST FASHION RETAILER INDITEX-ZARA;The successful implementation of an integrated supply chain strategy enhances total control over the operations and thus enhances speed and flexibility. The objective of this study is two-fold: first to identify the constituents that mold the fast fashion retailing business model, and second to discuss how global leader of fast fashion retailing Inditex-Zara’s product offering is strongly supported by integration of various supply chain operations. The findings suggest that vertical integration through ownership of various operational stages including product design and development, production operation, logistics and distribution channel; appropriate sourcing strategy to meet product needs; application of process/product modularity practices in product design, material procurement and manufacturing to ensure manufacturing flexibility; flexible logistics capability; and all of these seamlessly integrated and coordinated by a centralized IT infrastructure can significantly raise overall supply chain flexibility and responsiveness. Inditex-Zara’s super-responsive supply chain reduces ‘bullwhip effect’, order-to-delivery lead time to stores, ensures lean inventory and high level of responsiveness to adapt and deliver products to stores with latest fashion trends and customer feedbacks at a rapid speed. Thus Inditex-Zara is able to successfully counter the negative effects of short product life cycles, high product variety, demand uncertainty and thus able to closely match product supply to the stores with market demand. This contributes to lower inventory backlogs; avoid mark-down losses and/or inventory stock out.
  • Sowmya, ASP/MECH;Thermal Power plant; Koodankulam nuclear power station;As a developing nation we need energy to support our future industrial & domestic needs. But the way to generate this energy does not depend solely on nuclear energy. Throughout the world many developed countries are shutting down their nuclear reactors and starts looking into alternative ways to produce energy in a safer and greener way. India can achieve its future needs but it will not be the safe for the country’s internal security and safety. Koodankulam is a place in the Tirunelveli district in Tamil Nadu, India. It is situated 25 km north-east of Kanyakumari and 35 km from Nagercoil.The place is notable as the construction site of the Kudankulam Nuclear Power Plant. It is also the location of hundreds of windmills used for power generation, eight of which are located inside the grounds of the nuclear plant. Since the beginning of 2011, this place has been embroiled in a nuclear plant controversy over its safety by its people. Recently there have been several struggles by local people against the project. Local people are afraid that in case of a natural disaster the reactor may blast. This paper will deal about the various dimensions of Koodankulam Nuclear Power Plant with both its positive & negative sides.
  • Sowmya, ASP/MECH;Differentiating supply chain strategies; This article reports on an investigation of supply chain strategies that are employed by light vehicle manufacturers in South Africa. The research method used was an exploratory and descriptive study. A face-to-face, semi-structured interview questionnaire was administered to senior supply chain practitioners, based on purposive sampling and the data was analyzed descriptively using SPSS software. The findings of the study revealed that both lean and agile supply chain strategies are employed by the manufacturers. All the light vehicle manufacturers followed a lean strategy for their inbound supply chain. While a few of them followed a lean supply chain strategy for their outbound supply chain, others followed an agile supply chain which suggests a leagile supply chain strategy. Three important conclusions can be drawn from the study. Firstly, despite the changing business conditions and increased customer demands, lean supply chain strategy is still the dominant strategy for light vehicle manufacturers in South Africa. Secondly, a supply chain strategy is not all about product characteristics as a determining factor. There are other criteria that could be used to determine supply chain strategies. Finally, light vehicle manufacturers do not always make decisions and implement practices in line with their chosen supply chain strategies. Hence, there are mismatch between practices and strategies. It is recommended that the vehicle manufacturers align their practices with their chosen strategy, since mismatching generally leads to problems and challenges in organizations.
  • Sowmya, ASP/MECH;Power Generation; Chandrapura Thermal Power Station; Originally, planners designed Chandrapur TPS to accommodate increasing of power demand and ensure stable power supply in Assam State. The power station was built with one 30 MW generation unit and had been operating since December 1972. At the time of appraisal, Assam was facing a serious power shortage. In view of the region’s inability to meet peak power demand, and in order to gain maximum benefit from valuable oil resources in the state, the Planning Commission of the Government approved this expansion project in July 1979 as a part of the state’s sixth five-year power development plan (1980/81-1984/85). The installation of the additional 30 MW power generation unit at Chandrapur TPS was consistent with development policy as it was then delineated. Due to the recent rapid growth of oil consumption, the Government of India currently is attempting to limit its dependence on oil imports by expanding domestic exploration and reducing domestic oil consumption. India has decided to abolish subsidies for and to deregulate several oil products as well. While the central government’s deregulation policy resulted in the exorbitant escalation of fuel oil prices, the state government has not been able to raise its electricity tariff for political reasons. As a result, Chandrapur TPS has been forced to suspend operations; it can not recover the fuel costs with the low electricity tariff and is no longer financially viable. Assam still faces a serious power shortage, so the project objective remains relevant.
  • Sowmya, ASP/MECH;Supply Chain Management: An Integrated Solution; The Textile Industry is characterized by a complex production network which spans many businesses and usually crosses International boundaries. It has become an essential commodity in day to day life like food and water. The verities of production in Textile field has spread in all areas right from apparel to Industrial fabrics, protective Textiles, Composite Textiles, Medical textiles, Automotives, Aerospace and in so many other areas. Now- a -days the product range are not within the periphery of one area but reached at nook and corner all over the world. Today, the sales are highly volatile and seasonal and to fulfill the requirements it needs good capacity planning, production scheduling, process control, inventory management to make the whole thing a profitable proposition. To make an integrated solution which spans stock balancing, inventory management, production planning and distribution scheduling a proper system needs to develop. Hence to make all the systems in order, it is ideal to have a proper supply chain Management in Textile Industries. Flow of information between business partners, producers to distributors and retailers, the inventory optimization, demand – supply is to be perfect through proper supply chain management. ABC Classification: In case of increasing uncertainty in the international market, the customers starts stocking of the materials and hence, subsequent problems arises in logistics and distribution. At that time, it is necessary to see customer profile, his routine demand & accordingly distribution is made. Importances are being empathized on valuable customers for up keeping the customer’s business on line.
  • Mr S Hemnath, AP/Mech; Case Study Of The Textile Industry In Tirupur; Bleachers Textile Pvt Ltd The study was carried out in the year 1996. All the data and estimates pertain to the year 1995. Tirupur, chosen as a sample town, represented a typical industry pattern in developing countries with many small and micro enterprises involved in an industrial activity. A lot of attention has been given to the industrial symbiosis model in Kalundborg (Denmark), where a few disparate large units have worked out an effective system to optimize the use of their material and energy resources (as described in Chapter 1). The industrial pattern in Tirupur is very unlike Kalundborg. Tirupur has a large number of small and medium units engaged in similar activities, a pattern much more representative of a developing country.
  • Mr S Hemnath, AP/Mech;Case Study on Investigation of fire accident analysis; Sakthivel Cotton mill; Textile industry is main production sector to improve economy of country. It consists of processing units like cotton mill, spinning mill, dyeing units, garments exports. Cotton industry primarily used to convert raw cotton into yarn product. Fire is a main hazard present in all process area of production field. The main causes of fire have many reason that static electricity, overheating, human error, environmental atmosphere and failure of electrical parts in machine. As per statistics date given from National Crime Record Bureau (NCRB), the number of person died due to stumpage is higher than people affected by fire at the time of fire accident. The samples are evaluated with hypothesis and T-Test. The position of fire emergency door is decided based on the result of t-test and evacuation timing calculation.
  • Mr S Hemnath, AP/Mech;Case study of Fire Accident in Buildings;The main aim of this study is to find solution to the problem of finding remedial measures to improve the Indian Economy. Even though the Government of India taking several measures to improve the Economy and standard of living of the citizens but still what was achieved so far is well below par. Still today we don’t have any control over Price rise, Inflation, Industrial output, Currency value and so on. So now we have to find some meaningful solution to the above problem that will be useful in discussing the paper
  • Mr S Hemnath, AP/Mech;A case study from India on leapfrogging in smart manufacturing; Daimler Pvt Ltd; Globally, manufacturing continues to grow through the decades. It now accounts for approximately 16 percent of global GDP and 14 percent of employment. However, the manufacturing sector’s relative size in an economy varies with its stage of development. In India, Manufacturing accounts for 16% of GDP and has remained relatively stagnant. Manufacturing has also witnessed an onslaught from competitive nations like China, while India suffers from some major technology gaps, and therefore most estimates put India at the level of Industry 2.0 in manufacturing. Germany on the other hand, has maintained its leadership position in Manufacturing and Technology through innovative initiatives like resource efficient manufacturing and Industry 4.0. The Paper seeks to conduct a desk research on the developments on Sustainable Manufacturing processes across the world, and suggest a few critical methods for emerging economies to leapfrog into Industry 4.0., using India as a case study.
  • Mr S Hemnath, AP/Mech;Case study on Factors affecting the Indian Economy;The main aim of this study is to find solution to the problem of finding remedial measures to improve the Indian Economy. Even though the Government of India taking several measures to improve the Economy and standard of living of the citizens but still what was achieved so far is well below par. Still today we don’t have any control over Price rise, Inflation, Industrial output, Currency value and so on. So now we have to find some meaningful solution to the above problem that will be useful in discussing the paper
  • P.Janagarathinam, AP/Mech;A Case Study of Just-In-Time System in Service Industry;Waiting in lines are experienced in our daily schedule. Waiting lines or queues cause inconvenience to customers. Just-In-Time (JIT), the dignified process of waste reduction and has been a very popular operational strategy because of its success in the manufacturing and production industry over many years. Various benefits like, improved operational efficiency, waste reduction, and faster response have been widely observed by previous researchers. Services are much like manufacturing. Therefore, successful implementation of JIT is vital to manufacturing as well as service industries. JIT focuses on the process, not on product. Therefore it can be applied to every process within manufacturing or service industry. The main objective of this research is to make use of a case study to present various issues regarding implementation of JIT for a service industry. This case study also shows the benefits of reduction in waiting period by employing JIT. The conclusion of this research indicates that JIT system is successful and operating JIT system leads to many advantages to the case industry.
  • P.Janagarathinam, AP/Mech;New Market Creation via Innovation: A Study on Tata Nano; A hybrid methodology comprising of a case study on the 2200 USD (equivalent to INR 1,00,000) car Tata Nano and supported with a quantitative survey on a random sample of prospective Nano customers has been deployed. The qualitative case study helps to understand the macro picture on how innovation helped create new market for the masses. The quantitative survey measures the impact of various attributes of Nano on customer’s intent to purchase. These attributes have been identified through interviews of prospective Nano customers. Factor analysis has been deployed to establish corporate brand equity, aesthetics, and value for money & reliability as main attributes of Nano. Regression analysis is used to find out the influence of these attributes on intent to purchase Nano.
  • P.Janagarathinam, AP/Mech;CASE STUDY: REDUCING LABOR COSTS USING INDUSTRIAL ENGINEERING TECHNIQUES;Introduce various industrial engineering techniques and use a case study to show how these techniques are applied in practice.The case study presented is from CompanyA, a bathtub manufacturer.The improvement process began with an audit of the current productivity situation.Then, following a master plan, productivity improvement actions were taken one by one.The result was a 20 percent reduction in cost after a two-year project. Because it is not possible to cover all aspects of the project in this chapter, the focus will be on the activities aimed at the reduction of labor cost.We also explain how the scope of the application of industrial engineering techniques is expanding.
  • P.Janagarathinam, AP/Mech; Tata “Nano”: The People’s Car; Nano, India’s first “People’s car,” may soon earn a place in history alongside Ford’s Model T, Volkswagen’s Beetle, and the British Motor Corp.’s Mini, all of which made automotive travel within reach of millions of customers who had previously been locked out of the car market. In January 2008 during India’s main auto show in New Delhi, Tata Motors introduced to the Indian public its ultra-cheap car “Nano” that was expected to retail for as little as the equivalent of $2,500, or about the price of the optional DVD player on the Lexus LX 470 sport utility vehicle. This event had driven unprecedented public attention, since Tata’s new vehicle was projected to revolutionize the auto industry.
  • P.Janagarathinam, AP/Mech;FEA Analysis: Roadtest of Cooling Fan; EnginSoft; Evaluation of stress and deformations is part of the design process. A good safety factor on fan-radiator gap along time is the aim to assure no-touch condition. An optimization activity is carried out on the shroud. The internally developed shroud design tool can guide CAD parametric geometries and FEA analyses in the construction of a n-dimensional space of the solutions with optimization algorithms (Sobol+Full factorial). The designer can thus identify the best geometrical parameters set (component thickness, height, quantity etc.) to reduce deformations with minimum possible mass contribution (fig.6). The new reinforced shroud is virtually mounted on CFM model and FEA is relaunched for validation.
  • K. Prakash, AP/Mech; Solar Panels Mis-Matched Produces Output of Lowest Value; MAS Solar Systems Private Limited, Coimbatore;Confuse misfortunes are because of the absence of indistinguishable properties in the interconnection of sun oriented cells or modules. Bungle misfortunes are a major issue in PV modules and clusters under certain conditions on the grounds that the yield of the whole PV module under most pessimistic scenario conditions is controlled by the sun oriented cell with the least yield. For instance, when one sun oriented cell is concealed while the rest of the module are not, the force being created by the “great” sunlight based cells can be scattered by the lower execution cell instead of fueling the heap. This thusly can prompt exceptionally limited force dispersal and the resultant nearby warming may make irreversible harm the module. Crisscross misfortunes are because of the absence of indistinguishable properties in the interconnection of sun oriented cells or modules. Confuse misfortunes are a difficult issue in PV modules and exhibits under certain conditions in light of the fact that the yield of the whole PV module under most pessimistic scenario conditions is controlled by the sun powered cell with the least yield. For instance, when one sunlight based cell is concealed while the rest of the module are not, the force being created by the “great” sun based cells can be scattered by the lower execution cell instead of fueling the heap. This thusly can prompt exceptionally limited force scattering and the resultant nearby warming may make irreversible harm the module. The impacts of current bungle and concealing on the force yield of single photovoltaic (PV) modules are all around dissected, yet just hardly any examinations address jumble misfortunes at a PV framework level that additionally limit the yearly vitality yield. The straightforward inquiry, what occurs if PV strings with various quantities of modules are associated in equal, has not yet been talked about in detail. If there should arise an occurrence of strings with inconsistent module check, the framework developer must conclude whether to utilize inverters with numerous most extreme force point (MPP) trackers, module-power streamlining agents, or to abbreviate all strings for adjusting the framework. Our discoveries from this investigation open another alternative. The numerical demonstrating of PV frameworks with strings of various length in corresponding to a few others which have an equivalent module check renders befuddle misfortunes beneath 1% for most framework setups. For setups where one string is one module shorter than the others, the crisscross misfortunes fall underneath 0.5%. In this manner strings with inconsistent length may well associate with a practical single-MPP inverter without causing huge vitality yield misfortunes. In addition, ordinary flimsy film PV modules are less touchy to befuddle than translucent silicon based ones. Diodes can be utilized to at the arrangement of board which can remove the most reduced worth. Accordingly, the yield isn’t dropped as much previously. For instance, a 5 board of 50 Watts wherein one board gets mis-coordinated, the yield before situation of diode is around 25 Watts while in the wake of setting diode the yield will be 40 Watts.
  • K. Prakash, AP/Mech; Case study on Separation of the different layers of solar panels;MAS Solar Systems Private Limited, Malumichampatti, Coimbatore; Silicon (Si) is the most usually utilized semiconductor material as it shapes the reason for incorporated circuit (IC) chips. Most sunlight based cells are likewise silicon based. The detachment of the layers are troublesome in modules. Monocrystalline sun powered boards are created from one enormous silicon square and are delivered in silicon wafer designs. The assembling procedure includes cutting individual wafers of silicon that can be appended onto a sunlight based board. … Numerous silicon particles are liquefied and afterward re-combined into the board itself. Silicon is a characteristic semiconductor, handily acquired and effectively altered (doped) to proceed varying in sunlight based boards to change over sun oriented vitality into power. Every single electronic gadget have a semiconductor gadgets inside which are most likely produced using doped silicon. Silicon (Si) is the most regularly utilized semiconductor material as it shapes the reason for coordinated circuit (IC) chips. Most sunlight based cells are additionally silicon based. The detachment of the layers are troublesome in modules. Monocrystalline sun oriented boards are delivered from one enormous silicon square and are created in silicon wafer groups. The assembling procedure includes cutting individual wafers of silicon that can be joined onto a sun powered board. … Numerous silicon particles are liquefied and afterward re-intertwined into the board itself. Silicon is a characteristic semiconductor, effortlessly acquired and handily adjusted (doped) to proceed varying in sunlight based boards to change over sun oriented vitality into power. Every single electronic gadget have a semiconductor gadgets inside which are presumably produced using doped silicon. Be that as it may, silicon cells alone can’t give power to your home. They are matched with a metal packaging and wiring, which permit the sun based cell’s electrons to get away and flexibly helpful force. Silicon arrives in various distinctive cell structures: single cell(monocrystalline), polycrystalline or undefined structures, most normally connected with slender film sunlight based boards.  This is a significant issue in the first Generation Solar boards. This can be overwhelmed by utilizing second Generation Solar Panels or by utilizing explicit answers for disintegrate EVA sheets which go about as a glue.
  • K. Prakash, AP/Mech;Case study on Solar Panels Absorbtion of light only at energy level of 1EV; MAS Solar Systems Private Limited, Coimbatore;Sun powered boards work by engrossing daylight with photovoltaic cells, creating direct current (DC) vitality and afterward changing over it to usable substituting current (AC) vitality with the assistance of inverter innovation. Around 23 percent of approaching sun powered vitality is caught up in the climate by water fume, residue, and ozone, and 48 percent goes through the air and is consumed by the surface. Accordingly, around 71 percent of the all out approaching sunlight based vitality is consumed by the Earth framework. limsy film sunlight based cells (TFSCs) experience the ill effects of helpless light ingestion because of their little thickness, which constrains the vast majority of their viable applications. Surface plasmons created by plasmonic nanoparticles offer an open door for a minimal effort and versatile technique to optically design TFSCs. Here, a deliberate reproduction study is led to improve the assimilation proficiency of undefined silicon (a-Si) by consolidating twofold sided plasmonic bi-metallic (Al–Cu) nanogratings. The upper pair of the gratings along with an antireflection covering are answerable for limiting the reflection misfortunes and improving the assimilation of low frequency obvious light range in the dynamic layer. The base sets are responsible for expanding the ingestion of long frequency photons in the dynamic layer. Along these lines, a-Si, which is a helpless safeguard in the long frequency area, is currently ready to ingest broadband light from 670–1060 nm with a normal reenacted assimilation pace of over 70%, and improved reproduced photocurrent thickness of 22.30 mA cm−2, separately. Also, recreation results show that the proposed structure uncovers numerous other superb properties, for example, little episode point lack of care, tunability, and momentous basic boundaries resistance. Such a plan idea is very flexible and can be stretched out to different TFSCs. This can be overcome by using variable doping materials which has ability to absorb energy level of their own property. This type is used in 3rd Generation of solar panels
  • K. Prakash, AP/Mech;Case study on Life of Organic Solar Cells;MAS Solar Systems Private Limited, Coimbatore; A typical organic solar cell consists of two semiconducting layers made of plastic polymers and other flexible materials. The cell generates electricity by absorbing particles of light, or photons. … The exciton splits, allowing the electron to move independently to a hole created by another absorbed photon. As a general solar industry rule of thumb, solar panels last about 25-30 years. However, this doesn’t mean that they stop producing electricity after 25 years – it just means that energy production has declined by what manufacturers consider to be a significant amount Single layer organic photovoltaic cells are the simplest form. These cells are made by sandwiching a layer of organic electronic materials between two metallic conductors, typically a layer of indium tin oxide (ITO) with high work function and a layer of low work function metal such as Aluminum, Magnesium or Calcium. Traditional crystalline solar cells are typically made of silicon. An organic solar cell uses carbon-based materials and organic electronics instead of silicon as a semiconductor to produce electricity from the sun. Organic solar cells have several important advantages. These include flexibility, low cost in both investment and environmental aspects, and semi-transparency. The active materials are made of carbon-based organic and plastic materials, which make the cells flexible, light and can be integrated with buildings and different structures. They also have a low environmental cost The components used to design solar cells should have high carbon rating to increase its life span
  • K. Prakash, AP/Mech;Case study on Low efficiency of Solar Tracking System; MAS Solar Systems Private Limited, Malumichampatti, Coimbatore;Solar energy is one of the primary sources of clean, abundant, and inexhaustible energy that not only provides alternative energy resources but also improves environmental pollution.To get a larger amount of solar energy, the efficiency of photovoltaic systems has to  made by using  a trackinng systems. Solar trackers offer the greatest value proposition in high latitude locations due to the yearly movements of the sun. Trackers direct solar panels or modules toward the sun. These devices change their orientation throughout the day to follow the sun’s path to maximize energy capture. … Because these trackers follow the sun vertically and horizontally they help obtain maximum solar energy generation g system. A single-axis solar tracking system uses a tilted PV panel mount and one electric motor to move the panel on an approximate trajectory relative to the Sun’s position. The rotation axis can be horizontal, vertical, or oblique To track the sun in two directions that is elevation and azimuth, a dual-axis tracking prototype is used to capture the maximum sun rays by tracking the movement of the sun in four different directions. One axis is azimuth which allows the solar panel to move left and right. This issue can be compensated by using more solar panels along with  dual-axis solar panel system
  • K. Prakash, AP/Mech;Energy Audit: A Case Study To Reduce Lighting Cost;Intech Plus Private ltd,Coimbatore;A count on lighting is done after proper identification and calculation about the replacement of the light as it should not affect the consumers need. In the Analysis , the energy consumption of tube lights along with ceiling fixture lights, CFLs and LEDs are evaluated and compared. Florescent tubes: The usage of 40 W tube light and ceiling tube fixture each 10X4W consumes the specified energy: Total number of tube lights being 208,total energy consumed by the tube lights is (108X40)*1+ (10X100)*1 = 5.32 kW hour.Assuming 7 working hours a day and 22 working days per month, total energy consumption by the tube lights are 5.32*7*22=819.28 kWh. The cost wise comparison is also done assuming Rs.5.00 per unit. The total amount is 819.28*5.00= Rs.4096.4 per month.CFLs: Replacing the 40W tube lights with 12 watts CFLs , total energy consumed by108+100= 208 CFLs is, 208*12*1 =2.496 kWhour. Assuming7 working hours a day and 22 working days per month, total energy consumed by the CFLs are 2.496*7*22=384.384kWh. The cost wise comparison is also done assuming Rs.5.00 per unit. The total amount is 384.384*5.00 = Rs. 1921.92.10 per month. LEDs: Replacing the 40W tube lights with 5 watts LEDs , total energy consumed by 108+100=208 LEDs are, 208 *5*1=1.04 kW hour. Assuming 7 working hours a day and 22 working days per month, total energy consumed by the LEDs is 1.04*7*22=160.16 KWh. The cost wise comparison is also done assuming Rs.5.00 per unit. The total amount is 160.16*5.00= Rs.800.8 It shows that replacing the conventional tube lights with energy saving CFLs or LEDs reduces the energy consumption drastically. In addition to this the CO2 emission is also reduced when the tube lights are replaced. Replacing a single tube light with a CFL will keep a half-ton of CO2 out of the atmosphere over the life of the bulb . A simple change in system can conserve energy and bring down the utility bill amount to a greater extent. Energy audit in all the sectors with few changes in the existing system can conserve energy, which in turn will reduce the power demands in our country. The government can decide policies to initiate the energy audit which will make a great change in the economical status of India in the global market.
  • V.S. Kaushik, AP/Mech;EVOLUTIONS OF HUMAN RESOURCE MANAGEMEN;Human resource management, or HRM, is defined as the process of managing employees in a company/ Organisation and it can involve hiring, firing, training and motivating employees. The purpose of Human Resource Management lies in successful utilization of people to attain specific as well as organizational goals. Human Resource Management typically means to engage, improve and preserve sufficiently capable employees, to implement the activities essential to achieve organizational aims. HRM has to prepare human resource planning, to recruit, select, place, induct, train and develop the human resources, to arrange for performance appraisal and to achieve the organizational objectives like to earn profit, growth and expansion, survival, diversification etc.
  • V.S. Kaushik, AP/Mech;HUMAN RESOURCE POLICIES;To improve industrial relations by evolving a suitable machinery for the settlement of disputes. To encourage mutual negotiations. To prepare and execute labour welfare programme. To arrange all possible facilities for the health, education and other welfare programmes. Clear and specific, yet flexible enough to meet the changing conditions Compliance with all appropriate law and regulation. Agreement with one another and reflection of an overall true and fair view approach to all employees Identify the purpose and objectives which the organization wish to attain regarding to its Human Resources department. Analyse the factors under the organization’s HR policy will be operating
  • V.S. Kaushik, AP/Mech;FORECASTING IN HRM;Suzi Automation Pvt.Ltd;A statement of what is judged likely to happen in the future, especially in connection with a particular situation, or the expected weather conditions: economic forecasts. A number of organizations, especially public sector units (PSUs) in India are facing the problem of surplus labour. It is the result of surplus labour that the companies later on offer schemes like Voluntary Retirement Scheme (VRS) to eliminate surplus staff. Changes in the business environment like competition, technology, government guidelines, global market, etc. bring changes in the nature of the job. This means changes in the demand of personnel, content of job, qualification and experience needed. HRP helps the organization in adjusting to new changes.
  • A. Natarajan, ASP/Mech;Automation in Turning;Swagath Industrial Corporation, Nallampalayam, Coimbatore;Swagath Industrial corporation is in the production of domestic pumps for which the casting items are machined in house. Earlier they were employing conventional lathes for turning the pump components and they were facing low production, high rejections and poor surface finish. When the market demand increased they were not able to meet the demand due to lower production from conventional lathes. Hence they went for CNC Machines for their turning requirements. With the installation of CNC Machines they could increase the production five fold with fewer rejections and very good surface finish. In conventional lathes machining was dependent on the skill of the operator whereas in CNC Lathes, programming takes care of the machining cycle and the operator needs only to load and unload the components from the machine for every cycle.
  • A. Natarajan, ASP/Mech; Manaul Molding Vs Automated Molding system; Santhi Casting Works, Narashimanaicken palayam, Coimbatore;Santhi casting works is in the production of automotive castings and they were employing Conventional Jolt Squeeze machines for producing sand molds to make the castings. By this method, productivity was lower, rejections were high and there was no consistency and there was always shortage of skilled moulding operators. When the demand went up they were not able to supply the castings in time and the management decided to install automatic molding machines. After installing the automatic molding machine, the production fo castings went up by 4 times with minimum manpower and with good quality, good consistency and less rejections. The management feels that even though the initial investment is high, they were able to deliver the castings both in volume and in time with less rejection rate and good consistency in quality of the castings.
  • A. Natarajan, ASP/Mech;PCB production Manual Vs Automated;Aiswarya Enterprises, Idayarpalayam, Coimbatore; Aiswarya Enterprises is in the process of manufacturing PCS boards and LED lightings. They were employing manual labor for producting the PCB board with lower output, higher component rejections and less consistency in the quality of the PCB Boards. Because of these factors the customers were not happy and when the demand went up the management decided to buy an automated PCB making system. After installing the automated system, the production went up by 8 times with better quality and good consistency. Now they are able to meet the increasing demand as well as they need not depend on the skilled workmen.
  • Naveen Kumar, AP/Mech;Chernobyl Disaster: Case study;The Chernobyl disaster was a nuclear disaster which occurred on April 26, 1986 at the Chernobyl Nuclear power plant, Ukraine. At that time, Ukraine was part of the Soviet Union. This accident was rated level 7, the most severe level, on the International Nuclear Event Scale. Large areas of Ukraine, Belarus, and Russia were badly contaminated. About 60% of radioactive fallout landed in Belarus. About 360,000 people needed to be moved to other places, where they could live after the accident. Many people suffered from long term illnesses and some people were even diagnosed with thyroid cancer and acute radiation poisoning. Most of the people affected have not died yet. When and if the people involved die of cancer, or related diseases, it will be hard to tell if this was because of the accident. The report thinks that up to 4,000 people may die from long term diseases related to the accident. Range from 4,000 to 27,000 by the Union of Concerned Scientists or Greenpeace who estimate that between 93,000 – 200,000 people died as a result of the disaster. The other three reactors at Chernobyl continued to operate after the disaster because there were not enough other power plants in Ukraine to meet the energy demands. Reactor 2 was decommissioned in 1991 after a fire in turbine hall. Reactor 1 was decommissioned in 1996, and reactor 3 decommissioned in 2000. In 2018, a 3800 panel, 1 megawatt solar plant was opened next to the former nuclear plant.
  • Naveen Kumar, AP/Mech;Three Mile Island: Case study; The Three Mile Island Nuclear Station (TMI) consists of an 840-megawatt (MW) reactor (Unit 1) and a 960-MW reactor (Unit 2) located about 10 miles southeast of Harrisburg, Pennsylvania, on an island in the Susquehanna River. At about 4:00 a.m., March 28, 1979, the main feed-water pumps connected with one of the two Unit 2 steam generators shut down, causing an automatic and almost simultaneous shutdown of the Unit 2 turbine.The accident halted the development of the U.S. Nuclear power industry for 30 years. During that time, no new nuclear power plants were approved. Several that were under construction at the time of the accident were completed. It also relied more heavily on coal and natural gas to power electric generation. That added a lot of greenhouse gases to the atmosphere than nuclear energy would have. As a result, global warming has caused more extreme weather events, rising sea levels, and many climate change effects. The accident at Three Mile Island was caused by a combination of hard-to-handle machinery, poorly trained or incompetent operators, and a regulatory process that lulled management into neglecting its own responsibilities. Congress, the public, the regulators, and the nuclear power industry reacted. Some overreacted, but there were also positive actions. The impact of the accident seemed to have a decay time constant that is, time required for the impact to diminish by half of about two years. This period is probably related to decay time of about one year for congressional and press interest.
  • Naveen Kumar, AP/Mech;Bhopal Disaster: Case study;Bhopal is known for its historical records, artificial lakes and greenery but most of all, the city is remembered across the globe for the worst industrial mishap of the world. On December 3, 1984, the world’s worst industrial catastrophe occurred due to the leak of Methyl isocyanate gas from the Union Carbide India Limited company (UCIL) in Bhopal 3 leak of toxic methyl isocyanate gas at a Union Carbide plant in the central Indian city of Bhopal produced history’s worst industrial disaster, stunning India and the world Post-midnight on December 3, 1984, poisonous gas that leaked from the factory of Union Carbide in Madhya Pradesh capital Bhopal killed thousands of people directly. The incident is now known as the Bhopal disaster or Bhopal gas tragedy. As per official records, the Bhopal gas tragedy killed 3,787 people. The figures were updated by the Madhya Pradesh government later as the immediate official estimate had put the death toll due to gas leak from Union Carbide factory at 2,259. However, activists fighting for justice for Bhopal gas tragedy victims put the figures of death between 8,000 and 10,000. In an affidavit, submitted in 2006, the government said that the Bhopal gas leak caused 5,58,125 injuries that included approximately 3,900 severely and permanently disabling injuries.The gas leak in the Union Carbide was reported after midnight on the intervening night of December 2 and 3. The incident had taken place at the Plant Number C of the Union Carbide factory in Bhopal.
  • M.K.RAHGUL POOPATHI, AP/Mech;FORD PRODUCTION SYSTEM;FORD;In 1913, Ford introduced assembly line manufacturing, a totally new approach in automobile making. Ford also became the first automobile maker to adopt 3D visualization tools like CAD, CAM in its manufacturing operations in the 1970s. In the mid-1990s, Ford revamped its operations, to induce greater flexibility and enhance the efficiency of its manufacturing processes. The reengineering effort was known as Ford Production System (FPS). 87YHNBU on the famous Toyota Production System, FPS aimed at developing and applying the best practices in automobile manufacturing. FPS involved the implementation of techniques used in lean manufacturing. Apart from using advanced technologies to help reduce waste, FPS emphasized the human aspects as well. It required its employees to form teams called work groups, and empowered managers to take work decisions without wasting time. Ford implemented the FPS in its plants across the world and realized improved productivity levels and financial performance. Ford initially produced cars using the Craft Production System (CPS). Under CPS, all cars were produced with same basic chassis and engine but with different designs according to individual customer preferences and tastes. However, in CPS, the manufacturing costs were high and did not decline with greater volumes. By 2003, all the plants of Ford had adopted FPS in their operations. It was estimated that after the implementation of FPS, Ford had achieved savings to the tune of $500 mn per year. The personnel at the plants also received web-based training while best practices were identified and shared between the plants. By mid-2003, Ford was in the process of standardizing manufacturing operations across all its plants globally.
  • M.K.RAHGUL POOPATHI, AP/Mech;JUST IN TIME PRODUCTION;TOYOTA;JIT originated in Japan. Its introduction as a recognised technique/philosophy/way of working is generally associated with the Toyota motor company, JIT being initially known as the “Toyota Production System”. Within Toyota Taiichi Ohno is most commonly credited as the father/originator of this way of working. The beginnings of this production system are rooted in the historical situation that Toyota faced. After the Second World War the president of Toyota said “Catch up with America in three years, otherwise the automobile industry of Japan will not survive”. At that time one American car worker produced approximately nine times as much as a Japanese car worker. Taiichi Ohno examined the American industry and found that American manufacturers made great use of economic order quantities – the traditional idea that it is best to make a “lot” or “batch” of an item (such as a particular model of car or a particular component) before switching to a new item. They also made use of economic order quantities in terms of ordering and stocking the many parts needed to assemble a car. Ohno felt that such methods would not work in Japan – total domestic demand was low and the domestic marketplace demanded production of small quantities of many different models. Accordingly Ohno devised a new system of production based on the elimination of waste. In his system waste was eliminated by: just-in-time – items only move through the production system as and when they are needed; autonomation – (spelt correctly in case you have never met the word before) – automating the production system so as to include inspection – human attention only being needed when a defect is automatically detected whereupon the system will stop and not proceed until the problem has been solved. In this system inventory (stock) is regarded as an unnecessary waste as too is having to deal with defects. Ohno regarded waste as a general term including time and resources as well as materials. He identified a number of sources of waste that he felt should be eliminated: overproduction – waste from producing more than is needed; time spent waiting – waste such as that associated with a worker being idle whilst waiting for another worker to pass him an item he needs (e.g. such as may occur in a sequential line production process); transportation/movement – waste such as that associated with transporting/moving items around a factory; processing time – waste such as that associated with spending more time than is necessary processing an item on a machine; inventory – waste associated with keeping stocks; defects – waste associated with defective items. At the time car prices in the USA were typically set using selling price = cost plus profit mark-up. However in Japan low demand meant that manufacturers faced price resistance, so if the selling price is fixed how can one increase the profit mark-up? Obviously by reducing costs and hence a large focus of the system that Toyota implemented was to do with cost reduction.
  • M.K.RAHGUL POOPATHI, AP/Mech; DISASTER MANAGEMENT;The flood that devastated Kerala in August 2018, following unprecedented heavy monsoon rain, was among the five major extreme flooding events in the world between 2015 and 2019, the hottest five-year period on record, according to the World Meteorological Organisation (WMO). The report, titled “The Global Climate in 2015-2019” and released on the eve of the United Nations Climate Action Summit in New York, provides an assessment of the state of the earth under the increasing influence of climate change and its impact. It says that the global average temperature has increased by 1.1°C since the pre-industrial period, and by 0.2°C compared to 2011-2015. Although data from the last six months of 2019 were not included, the report said that this year, too, would most likely join the preceding four years to be “the warmest of any equivalent period on record globally”. The flood in Kerala in August 2018 was the fifth biggest in the world during the five years from 2015, after similar events in China (June-July 2016), North-eastern India (August 2017), Sierra Leone (August 2017) and Japan (June-July 2018). There is increasing evidence that human-induced climate change is responsible for the rise in extreme weather events all over the world. The report estimates that over 20,000 people died in extreme weather events during 2015-2019 and in all, such events resulted in $572 billion in economic losses worldwide. Around 30 per cent of the world’s population now live in climatic conditions that deliver potentially deadly temperatures at least 20 days a year. Among all weather-related hazards, tropical cyclones were associated with the largest economic losses, with floods, landslides and associated loss and damage. The hazard with the maximum economic loss was Hurricane Harvey in 2017, which led to an estimated economic loss of more than $125 billion. The period from 2015 to 2019 also saw a continued rise in carbon dioxide levels and other greenhouse gases in the atmosphere which set new records. Carbon dioxide growth rates were nearly 20 per cent higher than the previous five years. Carbon dioxide stays in the atmosphere and the oceans for centuries, and will continue to cause a rise in temperature, in turn leading to the melting of ice, the retreat of glaciers, rise in sea level, ocean temperatures and extreme weather events. Rising carbon dioxide concentrations have also led to an increase in ocean acidification. At the same time, the level of oxygen has been on the decline in the open and coastal oceans, including estuaries and semi-enclosed seas, the report points out. The capacity of the oceans to absorb heat is a critical part of the climate system, and the report indicates that ocean heat content has reached record levels since 2015. The year 2018 had registered the largest ocean heat content values on record, with 2017 ranking second and 2015 third. The WMO report says the likelihood of many of such extreme weather events has been significantly increased by anthropogenic climate change, and evidence is mounting that it is the medium and low-income countries and the poor of the world who are more exposed and vulnerable to such climate variability and extremes.
  • M.K.RAHGUL POOPATHI, AP/Mech;UTILITARIAN THEORY;There is a difference between rule and act utilitarianism. The act utilitarian considers only the results or consequences of the single act while the rule utilitarian considers the consequences that result of following a rule of conduct . Why the two approaches? Consider the following case: Someone goes to the doctor.  The person is ill, experiences pain and dysfunction. The doctor performs a series of test and examinations.  The person returns to the doctor’s office to learn of the results, the diagnosis and prognosis.  The doctor is aware that the tests all show that the person has a disease that is incurable and life threatening. In fact even under the most aggressive treatment option there is a survival rate of less than 15% for two years.  The doctor is considering what would be GOOD to tell the person. Should the person know the truth or should the person be told something other than the truth?  Which is better?  Which is the right thing to do?  What would be GOOD to do? The act utilitarian might calculate that in telling the truth there will be a great deal of pain and hardly any pleasure at all  The person will be upset, their family will be upset, the doctor will be upset in informing the ill person that there is nothing that the doctor can do to alter their condition.  The doctor’s staff will be upset seeing the person come in for whatever treatment there may be. On the other hand if the doctor makes up a story concerning the diagnosis and prognosis that is not true but that gives the ill person more time to enjoy life before the illness makes it obvious that the end is near, well then the results are different.  The doctor is not so upset in seeing the person, the doctor’s staff is not upset. The family and friends of the person have some more time with that person to enjoy things instead of being morose and depressed.  So the ACT utilitarian might calculate that the GOOD is to lie.  The rule utilitarian would need to consider what would the long term consequences be if doctors were to lie to those who come to them and have life threatening, incurable illnesses.  The rule utilitarian might calculate that people would no longer be able to trust their doctors and this would break down the confidence they need for their therapies to be effective.  The RULE utilitarian might calculate that there is far more harm in lying and so the GOOD is to tell the truth. The same result might obtain were there to be a consideration of cheating on an examination.  The single act might produce a great deal of happiness for the cheater, teacher, family and friends.  The rule of cheating might produce quite the opposite result as society could no longer trust that the doctors, lawyers, engineers, repair people etc.. really know what they are doing and deserve their position. Rule Utilitarianism (RU) has no rule other than UTILITY. Every act is evaluated according to the utility. Does it or doesn’t it produce HAPPINESS. Utilitarians must maximize HAPPINESS. They must never accept unhappiness if they can minimize it . Both ACT and RULE utilitarians must ASSUME NOTHING. They must actually poll or measure what act will produce the greatest utility. The difference is that the ACT UTILITARIAN measures the consequences of a SINGLE ACT. The RULE UTILITARIAN measures the consequences of the act repeated over and over again through time as if it were to be followed as a RULE whenever similar circumstances arise. NOTHING is right or wrong in itself for a utilitarian. NOTHING! It all depends on the consequences of the act, the results are what matters not the act.
  • A.VIMALKODEESWARAN, AP/Mech; Boiler Tubes Failure: Case study;National Fertilizers Limited ; When boiler no 3 was running hissing sound was noticed from Northeast side of economizer and leakage in the coils were detected and water was leaking out before E.P. duct. After cooling down the manhole cover of economizer & ISSH were opened and found the leakage in extreme north bottom. the observation are that bottom loop N-S in the segment was found leaking and having 3 mm hole, moreover the coil was totally eroded over 3 meter in length and its thickness was reduced to 2.5 mm. Economizer tube leakage was occurred due to superheater fireside ash erosion and corrosion. Fireside ash corrosion is a function of the ash characteristics of the fuel and boiler design. It usually is associated with coal firing. Ash characteristics are considered in the boiler design when establishing the size, geometry and materials used in the boiler. Combustion gas and metal temperatures in the convection passes are important considerations. There are many reasons due to which the failure of boiler tube occurs some are Caustic Attack, Oxygen Pitting, Hydrogen Damage, Acid Attack, Stress Corrosion Cracking (SCC), Waterside Corrosion Fatigue, Super heater Fireside Ash Corrosion, High temperature Oxidation, Water wall Fireside Corrosion, Fireside Corrosion Fatigue, Short-term Overheat, Long term Overheat, Graphitization, Dissimilar Metal Weld, Erosion and Mechanical Fatigue. There may be some other reasons depends upon the service conditions but we can diagnose the reason in advance by visual inspection and NDT techniques which can save the production loss of the industry and increase the safety of workers
  • A.VIMALKODEESWARAN, AP/Mech; Recycling of oleochemical wastewater for boiler feed water using reverse osmosis membranes – Case study ;Wastewater recycling appears to be attractive for water conservation. THE oleochemical wastewater treatment using an advanced process that comprises ultrafiltration (UF) and reverse osmosis (RO) membranes. Prior to the membrane process, the oleochemical effluent was first treated using a biological treatment system that was installed by the factory owner. The quantity and quality of the permeate stream of the membrane system were then periodically monitored over 43 days. The results showed that the system functioned effectively in reducing the chemical oxygen demand (COD), hardness content and the amount of total dissolved solids (TDS). However, the system started to deteriorate after 15 days of operation. Membrane biofouling was suspected to have occurred in the RO membrane. Nevertheless, the fouling problem could be resolved by chemically cleaning the RO membrane using a sodium hydroxide (NaOH) solution every 3– 5 days. Despite of the fact that data set for a longer period is needed to provide a more comprehensive study on the biofouling mechanism of membrane.
  • G.Tharanitharan, AP/Mech;Failure of Shaft due to Critical Speed of Shaft and Improper pulley placement ; VG Industry;VG Industries is the leading service Sector for Automobile repair and Maintenance. In the Industry having so many Machine available with common single Prime mover. so Lengthy line shaft is attached here to drive all machine. Here Survival of line shaft is too low. Replacing shaft every 8months.Investigated about this problem. identified the proper Solution to overcome this problem. Because of Improper pulley Placement the  shaft  failed at above critical speed. so we overcome this Situation Pulley is placed at Right place based upon the design calculation and operate the Prime mover within Critical Speed of shaft(Whirling Speed of Shaft).
  • G.Tharanitharan, AP/Mech;Failure of Propeller Because of its Higher Length;VG Industry;Some of the Automobile, between Prime movers and Wheel having lengthy Shaft. Because of Heavy Torque and Speed the Lengthy Shaft will fail due to Self Weight of Shaft. Investigated this Problem, here Shaft Subjected to Pure Tensile Strength and Pure Torque. Maximum Stress Contribution in this Situation Shear Stress Compared to Tensile Stress. To overcome this Situation, Instead of Lengthy Shaft we can use two or three Coupling in between for Smooth Driving. but Little Power loss while driving the  shaft. we can operate this shaft in all Speed and Torque without any Failure.
  • G.Tharanitharan, AP/Mech;Failure of Shaft due to Bending Stress and Torque;VG Industry;In VG Industry, Lengthy Shaft used to drive all Machine with one Common Prime mover. Length of Shaft Approximately 1m.Four Pulley are Mounted on Shaft. Two Pulley A,B at Extreme left and Right Corner .Another Pulley C is Fitted 300mm Away from right of Left Side Pulley. Pulley D is also attached 400mm to Left of Right Side Pulley.Bearing X and Y Attached to the 100mm away from left and Right Side bearing respectively. Diameter of Shaft is approximately 30mm.Shaft Failed in one Condition .Investigated this problem with Same practical Setup. Because of  bending Stress the shaft will fail. Based on Design Calculation we found the Maximum Bending Stress  at pulley C .We designed Shaft based on Maximum bending Moment (Pulley C).Replaced 30mm Pulley diameter to 50mm.Now Smooth Running  of Shaft without any Deflection and Failure.